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Labor


ABRAMOWITZ, HOWARD
Papers, 1937–1985, .33 ft. (APAP–062)
Includes copies of union leaflets and correspondence, 1937–55; drafts of papers by Abramowitz, 1981–85; and a carbon copy of an unpublished biography of Walter Reuther by John W. Anderson, an acquaintance of his and member of the UAW. These papers consist of files kept by Abramowitz when researching the history of the CIO and its affiliates, especially the UAW and the furniture workers. Abramowitz was a labor historian who studied radical movements in the United States and taught at Skidmore College in Saratoga, New York.

ALBANY ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL
Records, 1908–1990, .33 cubic ft. (APAP–075)
The Albany Allied Printing Trades Council collection contains meeting minutes from 1908–1915 and 1930–1988. Council by–laws are available from 1910, 1967, and 1990. The Council's correspondence is sporadic from 1959 through 1985. The collection also includes the Council's union label slug. The Council is an organization of local unions involved in all aspects of the printing trade in Albany, New York. The composition of the council included those local unions whose members were printers, bookbinders, stereotypers, electrotypers, photoengravers, and mailers.

ALBANY CENTRAL FEDERATION OF LABOR
Records, 1965-2000, 3.8 cubic ft. (APAP-143)
The Albany Central Federation of Labor was organized on June 8, 1888 by workers in the Capital District. The Albany Central Federation of Labor is a local labor council through which the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) organizes to build and strengthen the national union movement. The collection documents the activities of the Albany Central Federation of Labor (AFL CIO) from 1965 to 2000 the period when Josephine Sano was president. Included in the collection are administrative files such as minutes, constitution, and financial statements. The numerous publications as well as the correspondence between Josephine Sano and other labor councils are a strong point of the collection.

ALBANY PRINTING PRESSMEN, ASSISTANTS, AND OFFSET WORKERS UNION, NO. 23–C
Records, 1951–1989, 1 microfilm reel (APAP–006)
Contains constitutions and by–laws, 1954, 1968; and minutes, 1951–89. In 1886 pressmen who belonged to the Albany Typographical Union No. 4, formed a printing pressmen's local affiliated with the International Typographical Union. By 1890, the union had reorganized as the Albany Printing Pressmen's Union, No. 23, affiliated with the International Printing Pressmen's Union of North America. In 1896 Local 23 added "Assistants'" to its title when the international became the International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America (IPPAU). In 1973 the IPPAU merged with the International Stereotypers', Electrotypers', and Platemakers' Union of North America (ISE&PU) to form the International Printing and Graphic Communications Union (IPGCU). With merger of the IPGCU and the Graphic Arts International Union (GAIU) in 1983, the union became Local 23–C of the Graphic Communications International Union (GCIU). The union represents employees involved with commercial and newspaper presswork in the Capital District.

ALBANY TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION, NO. 4
Records, 1850–1988, 28 microfilm reels (APAP–007)
Includes minutes, 1850–1955, 1874–1988; contracts, 1893–1972; constitutions, 1850–1955; membership records, 1907–88; the Albany Citizen, a strike newspaper, 1928–29; and photographs and memorabilia, 1872–1950. Founded in 1850 as the Printers' Union of the City of Albany, the union's name was changed four years later to the Albany Typographical Union, when it affiliated with the National Typographical Union (later the International Typographical Union, which in 1986 merged with the Communication Workers of America). The Albany Typographical Union is the oldest union in the New York State Capital District and represents compositors in the newspaper and commercial printing trades.

BLOCH, EDWARD
Papers, 1939–2001 (APAP–115)

The collected papers of Edward James Bloch detail his early life, his military service in the Marine Corps during World War II, his three years in Turkey teaching biology, leadership in the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America (UE), the Labor Action Coalition, the Capital Labor Religion Coalition, Interfaith Impact, Interfaith Alliance, three unsuccessful campaigns for Congress, and personal papers and correspondence. Seeing the horrors of World War II in combat and in the occupation of China, he changed his allegiance from capitalism to socialism in the post-war period. During the Vietnam War, he protested US military intervention in Southeast Asia as a member of the organization Veterans for Peace in Vietnam. Correspondence and creative writing make up the majority of Bloch's papers. His letters are particularly voluminous between 1944 and 1946, when he served in Okinawa and China as a Marine. Other letters in the collection span his career in the UE, Congressional campaign runs, and varied personal subjects. Beside correspondence, Bloch wrote poetry, plays, essays, and other literature. These writings begin in the published version of his very early poetry, Verses (1931). Of the records kept on the UE and Bloch's other union work, those files on General Electric and FBI files on Bloch and the UE stand out above the rest.


BOYD, RALPH F. (APAP-165)
Papers, 1940-1980, 2 cubic ft. (APAP–165)

The papers of Ralph Boyd document Boyd's years as an employee of General Electric in Schenectady, NY, and a member of the Schenectady Branch of the NAACP. The collection includes: General Electric manuals for foremen and on shop operations; election and other material from IUE Local 301, circa 1940s-1980; NAACP brochures and financial documents, circa 1960s-1970s; and material from the Human Rights Commission, undated.

CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION (CSEA), LOCAL 1000, AFSCME
Records, 1925–1989, 45 microfilm reels (APAP–015)
Contains board meeting transcripts, 1933–80; board meeting minutes, 1979–81; delegate meeting transcripts, 1947–80; committee minutes, 1948–84; Legal Files, 1974–83; and CSEA's newspapers (Civil Service Leader, then The Public Sector), 1944–89. The Civil Service Employees Association (CSEA), New York State's largest public employee union, was formed 1910 and the first union organized solely for State workers. A dramatic increase in membership occurred in 1947, when employees of Westchester County won a CSEA charter in 1947 and membership was open to local government workers. With the 1967 implementation of the New York State Taylor Law, the State goverment was required to bargain with employees, and CSEA's power and status increased considerably. At midnight on March 31, 1972, CSEA began the first strike by New York State employees. Although strikes are illegal under the New York State Taylor Law, the strike ended two days later with CSEA winning many improvements in its contract. In 1974 CSEA divided itself into six geographic regions (Long Island, Metropolitan, Southern, Capital, Central and Western), each with its own office.  CSEA began a trial affiliation with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) in 1978. This affiliation became permanent in 1981, making CSEA, Local 1000, AFSCME, the largest affiliate of AFSCME.

COLUMBIA COUNTY TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION, NO. 896
Records, 1927, 1936–1968, 1 ft. (APAP–013)
Contains minutes, 1936–66; correspondence, 1941, 1948–68; and contracts, 1937–66; apprentice record book, 1955–64; and annual banquet programs, 1927, 1951, 1964. The Hudson Typographical Union, No. 896 was chartered in August 1925 and surrendered its charter during the Great Depression. In December 1936 the local's charter was restored, and the local became the Columbia County Typographical Union, No. 896, expanding its jurisdiction as it began to organize printers outside of Hudson, N.Y., including Chatham and Catskill N.Y. By the 1960s the typographical workers' union, which was always small, suffered from the introduction of greater automation and more stringent reporting procedures from the government.  In 1966 the local merged with the Albany N.Y. Typographical Union No. 4.

COMMUNICATIONS WORKERS OF AMERICA, LOCAL 1104, EDUCATION DIVISION
Records, 25 cubic ft. (APAP–132)

The Education Division of Communication Workers of America, Local 1104 represents "employees eligible for union membership who are employed as: graduate students holding State-funded positions as Graduate Assistants or Teaching Assistants employed by the State University of New York." The collection includes news clippings, contracts, photographs, administrative records, as well as ephemera such as t-shirts, buttons, hats, and cup holders.

COMMUNICATIONS WORKERS OF AMERICA, LOCAL 1104, OPERATORS AND SERVICE EMPLOYEES
Records, 25 cubic ft. (APAP–121)

The Operators and Service Employees Division of Communication Workers of America, Local 1104 represents those in the telecommunications industry. The collection includes board meeting information, calendars, contracts, financial records, photographs, and related information.

COUNCIL 82, SECURITY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEES, AFSCME
Records, 1968–1989, 10.2 cubic ft. and 1 reel microfilm (APAP–066)

Contains executive committee minutes, 1978–85; legal files, 1976–85; subject files, 1968–85; and Council 82's newspapers (Council 82 Review, then Council 82 Enforcer), 1971–89. Also included are the records of Council 82's Sing Sing Local 1413, 1972–80. Up until 1999, Council 82 was the exclusive bargaining representative of over 22,000 Security and Law Enforcement employees, with the exception of the State Police.  On April 29, 1999, The NYS Correction Officers and Police Benevlolent Association won an election giving it the right to represent the Security Services Unit. The state prison supervisors voted to remain with Council 82. Council 82 was formed from the merger of Councils 30 and 50 in 1969. In September 1971 a riot at the Attica Correctional Facility in Attica, New York, left 11 corrections officers and 32 inmates dead. Council 82 used this incident to petition the state for more satisfactory working conditions and an increase in staff. In April 1979 Council 82 went on strike for 16 days and was fined $2.5 million for contempt of court under New York's Taylor Law. In 1984 the Union of Federated Corrections Officers (TUFCO) challenged Council 82 as the exclusive representative of the state's Security and Law Enforcement Employees, but Council 82 won the PERB election.

EMPIRE TYPOGRAPHICAL AND MAILER CONFERENCE
Records, 1919–1990, 1 microfilm reel (APAP–016)
Contains proceedings of semi–annual conferences, 1934, 1938–75; bulletins, 1919–20, 1930–38; official calls to conferences, 1983–90; and newspaper clippings, 1929–37. Originally called the Empire Typographical Conference, the conference organized in September 1918 as a means for typographical unions to discuss common problems, to assist each other, and to promote unionism in general.  In 1972 the name was changed to the Empire Typographical and Mailer Conference to recognize the contribution of the member mailers' unions. Originally an affiliate of the International Typographical Union (ITU), the conference affiliated with the Communications Workers of America when the ITU merged into that union in 1986.

EMPLOYEE OWNERSHIP PROJECT
Records, 1967-2000, 10.17 cubic ft. (APAP-120)
The Employee Ownership Project (EOP) is an independent, non-profit organization formed in 1987, whose main objective is to improve the lives of low and moderate income residents of the Capital Region through the creation and growth of micro-enterprises and small business ventures. The EOP has been influential in starting dozens of small businesses, which have created or maintained over one hundred jobs for low and moderate income individuals. The EOP helped start up businesses such as a convenience store, a sewing factory, a dry cleaning business, a contracting firm, and an asbestos and hazardous waste removal business. The EOP serves people who might not otherwise be considered entrepreneurs and tries to match people with complimentary skills necessary in effort to create successful businesses.

FRIED, JOHN H. E. (1905– ), political scientist
Papers, 1941–1986, 10 ft. (GER–014)
Biographical materials, ca. 1941–1986; correspondence, 1954–1975; manuscripts, 1940s–1970s; lecture notes, examinations, and related materials, 1941–1970; and offprints. Fried was born in Vienna; wrote extensively on comparative government, labor economics, and the Vietnam War; was Special Legal Consultant to the U.S. War Crimes Tribunals at Nuremberg, 1947–1949, and was coeditor of the Trials of War Criminals before the Nuremberg Military Tribunals, 1950–1953; worked for the United Nations, 1951–1954, 1964–1966; and taught at the New School for Social Research, City University of New York, and other institutions, 1942–1970.

FRIEDLÄNDER, WALTER A. (1891–1984), social work
Papers, 1925–1978, 22 ft. (GER–003)
Correspondence with Karl Frankenstein, Kurt Richard Grossmann, Ella Kay, Oskar Kohn, Paul Tillich, and others, 1925–1978; and manuscripts and offprints, 1922–1970. Friedländer received a doctorate in law from the University of Berlin in 1913 and was from then until 1933 a magistrate in charge of the local office for youth and social welfare in the Prenzlauer Berg district of his native Berlin. He was president of the German Child Welfare League, 1931–1933; director of a refugee service in Paris, 1933–1936; professor at the University of Chicago, 1936–43; and professor at the School of Social Welfare at the University of California at Berkeley, 1943–1956. He published numerous books and articles on international social services in the United States and Europe.

FULTON COUNTY TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION, NO. 268
Records, 1894–1963, 1.25 ft. (APAP–018)
Contains minutes, 1894–1963; contracts, 1901–30, 1953–63; and constitution, 1954. The Fulton County Typographical Union was chartered in 1894 as an affiliate of the International Typographical Union (ITU) to represent printers working primarily in Gloversville and Johnstown, N.Y. In 1932 the union experienced difficult negotiations with a local newspaper, and the Open Shop Department of the American Newspaper Publishers Association filled the composing room with replacement workers. The ITU merged with Communications Workers of America in 1988, and Fulton County Typographical Union, No. 268, became an affiliate of CWA.

GLOVE CITIES AREA JOINT BOARD, AMALGAMATED CLOTHING AND TEXTILE WORKER'S UNION (ACTWU)
Records, 1933–1989, 10 ft. and 6 microfilm reels (APAP–017)
Contains the records of the Glove Cities Area Joint Board of the ACTWU, including minutes, 1954–87; subject files, 1941–86; and contracts, 1946–86, and minutes, 1939–87, of affiliated locals. Also contains the records of the New York State Capital District Joint Board: minutes, 1966–72, 1981–83; membership card file, 1933–83; minutes of affiliated locals, 1942–89; and the records of the New York State Capital District Union Label and Service Trades Council, 1960–81. The Glove Cities Area Joint Board of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA) was founded in Gloversville, N.Y., in 1954. This Joint Board originally had jurisdiction over the clothing workers' unions in Gloversville, N.Y., Johnstown, N.Y., and nearby villages. These locals were primarily locals of glove and leather goods workers. The Capital District Joint Board of the Shirt, Collar and Pajama Workers of Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA) was founded in Troy, N.Y. in 1934 with jurisdiction over locals of clothing workers in Albany, Schenectady, and Rensselaer counties. In 1976 both joint boards were affected by the merger of ACWA with the Textile Workers Union of America (TWUA), which produced the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (ACTWU). In 1985 the joint boards merged into one, keeping the title Glove Cities Area Joint Board. These records are particularly important for the information contained on labor strife in Fulton County, N.Y., from the 1930s to the 1950s. For related records, see the records of the Hudson Valley Area Joint Board, ACTWU. Records document the decline of textile and leather goods industries in the New York State Capital District in the 1970s and 1980s.

GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS INTERNATIONAL UNION, LOCAL 10–B (BOOKBINDERS)
Records, 1892–1989, 2 reels (APAP–020)
Contains the charter, 1892; minutes, 1907–89; constitutions, 1960–82; and contracts, 1962–69. Local 10 of the International Brotherhood of Bookbinders (IBB) was chartered in Albany N.Y in 1892, the year the IBB was formed. This local most likely was comprised of bookbinders affiliated with Albany Typographical Union No. 4. When the IBB merged with the Lithographers and Photoengravers International Union (LPIU) in 1972 to form the Graphic Arts International Union (GAIU), the local became number 10–B.  When the GAIU merged with the International Printing and Graphic Communications Union (IPGCU) in 1983, Local 10–B became a local of the Graphic Communications International Union (GCIU).

GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS INTERNATIONAL UNION, LOCAL 259–M
Records, 1941–1988, 5 microfilm reels (APAP–021)
Contains minutes of general membership meetings, 1947–88; minutes of executive board, 1950–88; meeting agenda, 1973–85; arbitration files, 1973–80; bylaws, 1951–83; correspondence, 1947–48, 1976; and contracts, 1980–88. Also included are the records of Local 58–C, which contain contracts and arbitration files, 1941–86. Graphic Communications International Union (GCIU), Local 259–M was created through the mergers of many other locals over the years, including the International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' of North America (IPPAU), Local 58, chartered in 1898 in Utica, N.Y.; the Albany N.Y. Photo–Engravers Union No. 21, chartered in Albany in 1921; the International Association of Amalgamated Lithographers of America (ALA), Local No. 59, chartered in Albany N.Y. in 1943; and Lithographers and Photoengravers International Union (LPIU), Local 259, formed from a merger of ALA Local 59–L, an. International Photo Engravers Union of North America (IPUENA), Local 21–P. Local 259 was involved in a number of legal cases against printing plants in the 1970s, including one at Amsterdam Printing and Litho Corporation that set a legal precedent for the repayment of wages lost due to unfair dismissal. Local 58 was involved in a strike against the Utica Observer–Dispatch in 1967 that included four other unions and closed down the newspaper for a hundred days.

GREATER GLENS FALLS CENTRAL LABOR COUNCIL, AFL–CIO
Records, 1959, 1969, 1977–1990, .5 ft. (APAP–019)
Contains minutes, 1977–90; correspondence, 1977–83; charters, 1959, 1969; and constitution, 1978. The Greater Glens Falls Central Labor Council was first organized in 1901. In 1959 the labor council was chartered as the Glens Falls N.Y. Trades and Labor Assembly. The charter was amended in 1969 when the council changed to its current name. The Labor Council is a delegate organization for labor union locals in Glens Falls N.Y. and vicinity.

HELSBY, ROBERT D.
Papers, 1966–1969, 1972–1980, 1985, 1987, .4 cubic ft. (APAP–086)
The papers of Robert D. Helsby include writings on labor relations, New York's Taylor Law and collective bargaining, and materials produced by New York's Public Employment Relations Board and its members such as Deputy Chair Jerome Lefkowitz. There are also news clippings and photographs from Helsby's tenure as chair of the Public Employment Relations Board. The collection also includes reports and documents produced by the State of New York about the Public Employment Relations Board and the Taylor Law.

HUDSON VALLEY AREA JOINT BOARD, AMALGAMATED CLOTHING AND TEXTILE WORKER'S UNION (ACTWU)
Records, 1919–1920, 1938–1989, 14 ft. (APAP–050)
Includes minutes, 1944–89; contracts, 1938–89; arbitration files, 1948–89; and memorabilia, 1945–85. Includes the records of the predecessor joint boards of the Hudson Valley Area Joint Board: the Amsterdam N.Y. Joint Board, 1948–81; Mid–Hudson Valley Joint Board, 1944–57; New York State Capital District Joint Board, 1919–20, 1940–65; and Columbia County Joint Board, 1938–57. Also includes minutes and other records of defunct  locals administered by these joint boards. Also includes the records kept by a TWUA International Representative, 1950–57; and a TWUA Assistant State Director, 1938–75, related to organizing locals; and the retained records of the Berkshire Joint Board, 1949–71. Because the managers of these joint boards were officers on regional labor councils, these records also include the retained records of the Upper Hudson Area Industrial Union Council, 1952–58; Upper Hudson Area Central Labor Council, 1956–84; Central Labor Union of Newburgh, New York, 1960–65; and Troy Area Industrial Union Council, 1948–60. These joint boards belong to the ACTWU and to its predecessor, the Textile Workers Union of America (TWUA). For related records, see the records of the Glove Cities Area Joint Board, ACTWU.

HUDSON VALLEY DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
Records, 1887–1989, 19.5 ft. (APAP–049)
Contains minutes of the council, 1966–81; contracts, 1954–87; and membership ledgers, 1975–83, and minutes of the Kingston N.Y. District Council of Carpenters, 1908–09. Also included are the records of many affiliated locals from the counties of Columbia, Chenango, Delaware, Greene, Otsego, Sullivan and Ulster, and parts of Orange and Schoharie counties; minutes, 1889–79; and membership ledgers.  The Hudson Valley District Council of Carpenters was chartered in 1955 in order to consolidate the numerous small district councils and independent carpenters' locals in the Hudson Valley. In 1974, all the local unions in the district council were consolidated into Local 255 of Bloomington, N.Y. Local 258 of Oneonta, N.Y. and Local 265 of Saugerties, N.Y. At this time Locals 301, 574, and 729 were consolidated into Local 255.

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MACHINISTS AND AEROSPACE WORKERS (IAMAW), LODGE 1145
Records, 5 cubic ft. (APAP-113)
The collection includes vouchers, bills, correspondence, administrative records, and related material from the IAMAW, Lodge 1145.

INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL 166
Records, 1909–1911, 1942–1980, 2 microfilm reels (APAP–022)
Contains minutes of regular meetings, 1942–62, 1966–83; minutes of executive board meetings, 1964–85; minutes of meetings with representatives for the employers, 1977–80; and minutes of meetings of District Council 4 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), 1909–11. IBEW Local 166 was chartered on March 20, 1934, as a local with jurisdiction over interior electrical work in Schenectady and its vicinity. Among the shops where Local 166 members work are General Electric in Schenectady, N.Y. and WTEN Channel 10 in Albany, N.Y.

INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA, LOCAL 201
Records, 1900, 1922–1982, 2 ft. (APAP–052)
Contains records of Local 201 and its predecessor locals: Local 12 (Troy, N.Y.), membership ledgers, 1922–51; Local 62 (Schenectady, N.Y.), minutes, 1936–44, 1965–82; Local 201 (Albany, N.Y.), minutes, 1962–81; and contracts, 1965–82. Local 201 now represents painters in Albany, Schenectady, and Rensselaer counties. Merging the three original locals had been discussed at least since 1979, and in 1982 the merger was completed and resulted in a more centralized and efficient management of the union.

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF BRICKLAYERS AND ALLIED CRAFTSMEN (BAC), LOCAL 16
Records, 1886–1892, 1917–1930, 1953–1986, 3 microfilm reels (APAP–010)
Contains minutes, 1886–92, 1917–30, 1973–86; contracts, 1953–85; and by–laws.  Bricklayers' Local 16 was formed in Schenectady, N.Y. during the summer of 1886.  The union was involved with masonry work in that city, including work at General Electric's Schenectady plant, American Locomotive Company, and Union College. In 1986, the union merged with Bricklayers' Local 6 of Albany, N.Y.

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ELECTRONIC, ELECTRICAL, SALARIED, MACHINE AND FURNITURE WORKERS (IUE), LOCAL 301
Records, 1949–1989, 7 reels of microfilm, 32 audio and video reels, and 7.4 cubic ft. (APAP–023)
Includes minutes of membership meetings, 1979–85, and of Officer and Executive Board meetings, 1969–85; subject files, including correspondence, press releases, contract negotiations, bulletins, constitutions, and bylaws, 1949–81; audio tapes, 1964–66; photographs, 1971–79; Local 301 News, 1954–89; printed histories, 1968, 1987. As a local of UE (United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of America), Local 301 was one of the first locals to join the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). However, the CIO expelled the UE in 1949 accusing the union of being Communist–dominated. In 1954 Local 301 joined the IUE, which replaced the UE in the CIO. Local 301 has been a pioneer in the U.S. labor movement, winning an agreement in 1941 providing pay equity for women, and successfully contesting unfair labor practices at General Electric's Schenectady, N.Y. plant in court.

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ELECTRONIC, ELECTRICAL, TECHNICAL, SALARIED AND MACHINE WORKERS, LOCAL 379, MATCH WORKERS' UNION
Records, 1944, 1946–1987, 1 ft. (APAP–024)
Contains minutes, 1946–1987; state contracts, 1946–1987; state by–laws, 1962–1982; and sample constitutions and contracts from other match workers' unions, 1947–1965. The match workers at the Universal Match plant in Hudson, N.Y., were first organized in 1946 as Federal Labor Union No. 24122. Federal Labor Unions were unions chartered and administered directly by the AFL (and afterwards the AFL–CIO) in trades that otherwise would not have been organized.  In 1971 the local voted to affiliate with IUE over the Textile Workers Union of America (whose organizing drive was run by the Hudson Valley Area Joint Board) and became IUE Local 379.  In 1981 Swedish Match bought Universal Match Corporation, and by 1989 the firm had closed its Hudson plant, marking the end of Local 379.

KELSEY, WILLIAM
Papers, 1977–2001, 20 cubic ft. (APAP–152)

The collection documents William Kelsey’s career working for New York State government especially related to the Public Employees Federation (PEF) and attempts to organize unions in opposition to PEF. The collection consist of correspondence, subject files, meeting agendas and minutes, labor union agreements, policy manuals, budgets, reports, annual labor union convention materials, and newsletters and magazines.

LABORERS' INTERNATIONAL UNION OF NORTH AMERICA, LOCAL 157 (APAP–076)
Records, 1912–1914, 1937–1972, .4 cubic ft.
The Laborers' International Union of North America, Local 157 records primarily document the union's activities for the period 1937–1972 through correspondence and meeting minutes. The records provide an account of routine operations by Local 157 including negotiations with employers, grievances, elections, as well as financial and membership records. The union's early members were predominantly Italian American, which means the membership lists of 1912–1914 are in Italian. The correspondence includes material specific to Local 157 as well as items from the national office having to do with legislation and other national issues. Included with the correspondence and meeting minutes are sporadic membership and officer lists.

KUYKENDALL, MARY
Papers, 1920s–1970, .2 cubic ft. (APAP–169)
The collection documents workers at General Electric and the city of Schenectady. The material includes a pamphlet for the General Electric alumni association, a book about the Steinmetz family, and other material about General Electric.

LINK, EUGENE P.
Papers, 1941–1991, 6.8 cubic ft. (APAP–025)
Correspondence with Herbert Aptheker, Lee H. Ball, Merle Curti, Buell Gallagher, Corliss Lamont, and others, 1941–91; lecture notes and course papers, 1951–77; and research files on Harry F. Ward (1873–1966), American medical history, and other subjects, undated  Link retained the records of the Religious Freedom Committee for the years 1955–64, including minutes of its Administrative Committee, financial and membership records, its newsletter Religious Freedom News, and occasional publications.  The Religious Freedom Committee was an interfaith, interracial group founded in New York City to work for the free exercise of religion under the First Amendment.  Eugene P. Link received a B.D. from Union Theological Seminary, 1933, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University, 1941; he taught history at the State University of New York colleges at New Paltz, 1950–63, and Plattsburgh, 1964–77, among other schools. Link has been an activist for unionism, joining the American Federation of Teachers in 1930s and United University Professions in the 1970s.

MENNILLO, DAVID J.
Papers, 1950–1980, .4 cubic ft. (APAP–171)
David Mennillo was a longtime employee of General Electric in Schenectady, New York. The collection includes material related to Mennillo's career such as training materials and his resume.

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION (NAWIC), CAPITAL DISTRICT CHAPTER
Records, 1975–2000, 7 cubic feet (APAP–122)
The records of the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC), Capital District Chapter include meeting minutes, correspondence, grant applications, and other records.

NEW YORK STATE PUBLIC EMPLOYEES FEDERATION (PEF), AFL-CIO, ENVIONMENTAL CONSERVATION DIVISION
Records, 1975–2000, 23.17 cubic feet (APAP–114)
The Public Employees Federation (PEF) was founded in 1979 to represent members of the Professional, Scientific, and Technical (PS&T) bargaining unit of New York State. PS&T employees had formerly been represented by CSEA, the state’s largest public employee union. PEF founders believed that the concerns of the PS&T unit were not adequately represented by CSEA, the majority of whose members were non-professional state employees. PEF’s stated mission is to “provide the leadership necessary for PEF members to achieve employment security, higher wages, better working conditions, and improved retirement benefits.” Materials in this collection document PEF activities at both the state and division level. There is extensive coverage of executive board activities from 1978 through mid-2000, annual conventions, committee meetings, and contract negotiations. Also included are files for PEF Division 169, PEF’s Environmental Conservation Division. These include correspondence, agendas and minutes for labor/management meetings, material on committees, and administrative files. This collection also documents the activities of reform groups and political parties within PEF (most notably, the Statewide Coalition for a Democratic Union) and PEF’s relationships with its national affiliates, the Service Employees International Union and the American Federation of Teachers. Particularly strong is the collection of bulletin board postings, which includes almost everything posted on Division 169 PEF bulletin boards from 1979 through 2000. There are also official PEF publications, including a near-complete run of PEF’s official monthly newsletter to members, The Communicator.

NEWSPAPER GUILD OF ALBANY, NEW YORK, LOCAL 34
Records, 1936–1989, 3 ft. (APAP–005)
Contains executive board and membership minutes, 1936–87; unit minutes, 1942–87;  bulletins, 1936–84; contracts, 1937–89; and organizing and litigation files, 1935–88.  The Newspaper Guild of Albany, N.Y.,  Local 34 was chartered on March 20, 1934, as the Tri–City Newspaper Guild of Albany, Schenectady, and Troy, N.Y.  as well as nearby cities.  In 1937, the guild won its first agreement and the first Newspaper Guild agreement in upstate New York when it signed a contract with the Albany Times Union. The Albany Guild's last strike in 1964 formed the basis for The Ink Truck, the first published novel of William Kennedy, who was one of the strikers. The local began as a union of reporters and editors, but over the years other newspaper occupations have been organized as the guild has subsumed independent unions. Currently, janitors and drivers, as well as employees from the business office and sales and circulation departments are represented by the guild.  Although the guild has confined most of its activities to the tri–cities, it has opened offices in Hudson and Glens Falls, N.Y.

PENSION RIGHTS CENTER
Records, 1974–2010, 1.0 cubic ft. (APAP–322)

Based in Washington D.C. and established in 1976, the Pension Rights Center seeks to protect and promote the retirement security of American workers, retirees, and their families. The organization works to establish laws to support its mission, helps thousands of workers receive wrongfully-denied pensions, and assists workers navigating the complexities of pension rules. The records consist of statements and testimony before Congress spanning several decades, other published statements on pension rights, newsletters, year-end solicitation correspondence, published handbooks providing advice on pensions, and background materials.

PFEIFFER, FRED (APAP-139)
Papers, 1980-2002, 3 cubic ft. (APAP-139)
The collection contain records resulting from Pfeiffer's work with various unions and activist organizations in the Albany, NY area, as well as a collection of union-related materials such as contracts, newsletters, and publications from CSEA, SEIU and the Labor Committee for Safe Energy. The collection also contians material on nuclear energy activism and organized labor's engagement with energy issues, labor organizing in Latin America during the 1980s and 1990s.

QUIRINI, HELEN
Papers, 1941-2001, 50.89 cubic ft. (APAP-102)
Helen Quirini worked at General Electric (GE) in Schenectady, New York and was active in the UE and IUE Local 301, the union at the GE plant. The collection documents her activism in labor and coummunity activities including the rights of senior citizens, the need for affordable health care, day care, human rights, the United Way, and other organizations.

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. AREA CENTRAL LABOR COUNCIL, AFL–CIO
Records, 1921–1988, 2 microfilm reels (APAP–034)
Includes records of the Schenectady Area Central Labor Council and of its predecessor organizations: Schenectady Federation of Labor, AFL; Schenectady Area Industrial Union Council, CIO; and Schenectady Trades Assembly, AFL.  Also includes minutes and general files of the Schenectady Trades Assembly, 1928–32; correspondence of the Schenectady Trades Assembly, 1921–23, 1944–49; charters of the Schenectady Federation of Labor, 1941, and the Schenectady Area Central Labor Council, 1959; printed constitutions of the Schenectady Area Industrial Union Council, 1952, and Schenectady Federation of Labor, 1955; and general files, which include meeting minutes, of the Schenectady Area Central Labor Council, 1970–86.  The Schenectady Trades Assembly was chartered on July 25, 1898, and was replaced in 1941 by the Schenectady Federation of Labor.  In the late 1950s, the Schenectady Federation of Labor, AFL, and the Schenectady Area Industrial Union Council, CIO, merged to form the Schenectady Area Central Labor Council, AFL–CIO.  This council is a delegate organization composed of union locals from the Schenectady area.

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION TRADES COUNCIL
Minutes, 1960–1961, 1966–1978, 1 microfilm reel (APAP–033)
The Schenectady Building and Construction Trades Council was a delegate organization of labor union locals representing those trades.  In 1978, the Schenectady Council joined with its counterparts in Albany and Troy, N.Y. to form the Tri–Cities Building and Construction Trades Council.

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. FEDERATION OF TEACHERS, NYSUT/AFT, LOCAL 803
Records, 1918–1989, 6 microfilm reels (APAP–036)
Includes minutes, 1944–89; newsletters, 1956–89; general files, which contain newsletters and correspondence, 1944–53, 1975; president's files similar to the general files, 1944–55; and contracts, 1967–80.  Also contains the records of the predecessor City Teachers Association of Schenectady, including the minutes of the regular and special meetings, 1918–34, and of the Delegate Assembly of the Department of Public Instruction of Schenectady, 1928–31; general files, 1937–53; and newspaper clippings, 1933.  The City Teachers Association of Schenectady was founded in 1918 to promote standards of professionalism in teaching.  From 1941 to 1944, teachers (alone among city employees) were not granted cost of living adjustments.  The association, however, was unsuccessful in convincing the Common Council to award these adjustments, so the teachers decided to form a union, the Schenectady Federation of Teachers, chartered in 1944.  Local 803  went on strike in 1975 in violation of the NYS Taylor Law. The local is affiliated with New York State United Teachers, American Federation of Teachers.

SCHENECTADY LABOR TEMPLE ASSOCIATION
Records, 1912–1967, 1976–1977, .8 cubic ft. (APAP–035)
The Schenectady Labor Temple Association was incorporated in 1907 and has been primarily interested in first the erection and then the management of the Schenectady Labor Temple. The Association has also been involved in promoting labor interests in Schenectady, New York, most obviously through the publication of an annual labor and business directory. The collection also contains minutes of meetings, 1912–1958; yearbooks, 1931–67; and by–laws, 1940s, 1960s. The Schenectady Labor Temple was designed by Schenectady architect R. L. Bowen and completed in 1927 on the corner of Clinton and Liberty Streets.

SHEET METAL WORKERS INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, LOCAL 83
Records, 1892–1989 (APAP–047)

Includes minutes of meetings, 1892–1989; committee records, 1931–82; files on jurisdictional disputes with other building and construction trades unions, 1952–77; NLRB case file on the 1965 lockout, 1965–69; and dues ledgers, 1892–1980.  Local 83 was organized in 1892 as an affiliate of the Tin, Sheet Iron and Cornice Workers' International Association, which itself was organized only four years previously.  The depression of 1893 weakened the fledgling international, and its AFL charter was revoked in 1896, but Local 83 continued through these hard times.  In 1899 the international union was rechartered as the Amalgamated Sheet–Metal Workers' International Association.  In 1903 this international merged with the Sheet Metal Workers National Alliance, creating the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers' International Alliance, which in 1924 granted Local 83 a charter with jurisdiction over Saratoga, Albany, and Rensselaer counties of New York.  The jurisdiction of Local 83 has since expanded to include twelve counties in the New York State Capital Region.

SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE OF THE CAPITAL DISTRICT
Records, 1980–2000, 10.0 ft. (APAP–042)
Contains minutes and administrative files, 1983–99; subject files, 1980–90; Solidarity Notes, the committee's newsletter, 1984–97; and photographs. During the 1983 Greyhound strike by the Amalgamated Transit Union, a coalition of labor unions was formed under the name the Greyhound Strikers Solidarity Committee of the Capital District.  At the end of this strike, the committee, believing that solidarity within the labor movement was essential to its survival, decided to continue as the Solidarity Committee of the Capital District.  Since that time, the committee has worked to support hundreds of strikes and labor activities, most of them in Eastern New York, but including many across the country and in Latin America.

TROY, N.Y. AREA LABOR COUNCIL, AFL–CIO
Records, 1942, 1969–1989, .25 ft. (APAP–037)
Contains minutes, 1981–89; correspondence, 1975–88; constitution and by–laws, 1987; and dinner journals, 1969–83.  The Troy Area Labor Council is a delegate organization for labor unions in Troy, N.Y., and vicinity.  The labor council is the successor to either the Troy Trades' Assembly (founded in 1864) or the Workingmen's Trades' Assembly (founded in 1882).

UNITED ASSOCIATION OF JOURNEYMEN AND APPRENTICES OF THE PLUMBING AND PIPE FITTING INDUSTRY OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA, LOCAL 105
Records, 1893–1989, 1.25 ft. (APAP–053)
Includes minutes, 1893–1989; contracts, 1929–89; and by–laws, 1976–87.  Also includes the records of Local 253: minutes, 1949–72; contracts, 1959–70; and by–laws, 1966. Local 105 was organized in 1893 with jurisdiction over plumbing and pipe fitting work in Schenectady County, NY. The local has had a typical history for a labor union, marked by occasional strikes, periodic struggles to survive economic downturns, and the widening of its geographic jurisdiction. Local 376 of Amsterdam, NY merged into Local 105 in 1962, and Local 253 followed suit in 1972.

UNITED AUTOMOBILE, AEROSPACE AND AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENT WORKERS OF AMERICA (UAW), FORD LOCAL 930
Records, 1944–1989, 2 ft. (APAP–038)
Contains minutes, 1944–66, 1975–89; correspondence, 1971–88; newsletters, 1971–72, 1984–85; contracts, 1961, 1970–87; constitutions and by–laws, 1964, 1974–83; photographs, 1944, ca. 1985; audio tapes, 1985; a published history, 1988; and memorabilia, 1968, 1982–88.  Also contains the records of the UAW New York Capital Area Political Action Committee, 1971, 1977–87.  UAW Local 930 was chartered on August 7, 1941.  The Ford Motors plant at Green Island, New York, produced automobile parts that were shipped to Ford assembly plants in the United States and Canada. During the last twenty years of operation, the plant produced leaf springs, radiators and heater cores.  The Ford plant closed in December 1988 and Local 930 in October 1989.

UNITED ELECTRICAL, RADIO, MACHINE WORKERS OF AMERICA
Newsletters, 1935–1954, 7 microfilm reels
Includes People's Press (Schenectady, N.Y. and U.E.R. & M.W. editions), Dec. 21, 1935–Sept. 4, 1937 (2 reels) and People's Press (U.E. edition), Feb. 15, 1936–Dec. 31, 1938 (2 reels). Also includes Electrical Union News, 1939–54, filmed with the Local 301 News, 8/12/55–12/21/62 (3 reels).

UNITED STEELWORKERS OF AMERICA AFL–CIO–CLC (USWA), LOCAL 8652
Records, 1977–1989, .2 cubic ft. (APAP–077)
The collection includes contracts from 1977 through 1989, meeting minutes from 1982, job descriptions for employees from 1980, scattered correspondence, and other materials related to union business. The closing of Portec Corporation's Troy facility is documented through the support services offered for employees by the union, a seniority list, and the shutdown agreement. The scrapbook includes photocopies of news clippings and photographs documenting union members on strike from 1986–1987 and the closing of the Portec plant in Troy. USWA Local 8652 was chartered in 1977, and was apparently the first union since the 1800's to represent steelworkers at what had become the Portec Corporation, Railway Products Division, in Troy, New York. In 1989 Portec closed its Troy plant and moved the operation, ending Local 8652's brief history.

UNITED UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONS (UUP)
Records, 1968–2000, 161.17 cubic ft. and 6 microfilm reels (APAP–039)
The records of United University Professions (UUP) document the activities the union of the faculty and non–teaching professionals of the State University of New York since 1973.  They begin in the 1960s with UUP's antecedents, the State University Professional Association (SUPA) and the Senate Professional Association (SPA), and continue through June 2000 for the Communications Department, and through May 1993 (the end of the Reilly administration) for most other series.Virtually all aspects of UUP's activities are covered by the records, including the actions of its policy–making bodies–the Delegate Assembly and the Executive Board; the activities of UUP as seen through the correspondence of its President and members, and through project and subject files; activities on and issues of concern to individual campus chapters seen through correspondence between chapter representatives and chapter members to UUP's Administrative Office and through newsletters created by individual chapters; contract negotiations between UUP and the State; UUP as presented in its publications; and photographs, video, and audio tape records of its activities.

UNITED UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONS (UUP) ORAL HISTORY PROJECT
Collection, 1970–1990, 2.0 cubic ft. and 53 audio tapes (APAP–099)
The UUP Oral History Project collection currently consists of three series: the recorded audio tapes of 36 of the 42 interviews, transcripts of those 36 interviews; and the project's administrative files consisting of the releases signed by interviewees, correspondence regarding the releases, and the copies of the transcripts marked with the narrator's requested changes. A fourth series consisting of the interviewer's research notes and collected background information on UUP (including materials provided to her by interviewees) is expected to be added to this collection in the near future. The interviews primarily focus on the establishment of United University Professions and the early years of its existence. The bulk of the events and personalities discussed occurred prior to UUP's creation and during the first three presidential administrations (Lawrence DeLucia, Samuel Wakshull, and Nuala McGann Drescher, covering from May 1973 to May 1987). In a few of the interviews, some references are made to the administration of UUP's fourth president, John M. Reilly, who was president at the time the interviews were conducted.

UNITED UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONS (UUP), ALBANY, N.Y. CHAPTER
Records, 1968–1990, .75 ft. (APAP–54)
Correspondence, 1973–78; memoranda, 1973–86; and newsletters, 1973–76, of the bargaining agent for academic and professional employees of the University at Albany, SUNY. Also includes the records of the local predecessor organizations, the Senate Professional Association, 1968–74; and the State University Professional Association, 1973–74.  Affiliated with New York State United Teachers and the American Federation of Teachers, United University Professions was founded in 1974.

WILLISON, MALCOLM
Papers, 1958–1997, 14.9 cubic ft. (APAP–055)

This collection details the social activism of Malcolm Willison in New York State's Capital Region. As an active board member of several local groups, his papers contain minutes, financial statements and budgets, programming ideas, brochures, planning notes, articles and reports, and clippings that detail the evolution of the various organizations contained in the collection. Organizational newsletters and event flyers, course and conference information planned by Willison in his capacity on executive boards, and vast amounts of correspondence about any number of events and issues are also part of the scope of the collection.

WISE, GEORGE
Papers, ca. 1989, .17 cubic ft. (APAP–095)
The collection is composed solely of General Electric's Century: A History of General Electric from its Origins to 1986, an unpublished manuscript. The manuscript will be helpful to researchers seeking background information about General Electric, which was founded in Schenectady, New York. The manuscript's chapter titles include: "The Old General Electric and the New GE;" "Edison and General Electric;" "Shoemakers;" "Schenectady, Strikes and Socialists;" "Virtous Cycles;" "Progressivism to Prgoress;" "How the Robots Didn't Devour Schenectady;" "Plastic Edicson;" and "Second Century."

WITTNER, LAWRENCE
Collection, 1977–2007, 3.16 cubic feet (APAP–100)

The Wittner Collection is a personal and organizational history of the Albany Chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America, the United University Professions (UUP) Solidarity Committee, and other activist groups in the Capital Region of New York State. The Albany Chapter of Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) records (1980–87) and the United University Professions (UUP) Solidarity Committee (1986–99) records are primarily made up of minutes of meetings, agendas, plans of action, flyers, financial statements, correspondence, photographs and other documents that provide information about the inner workings of these organizations and issues that they were working on. The records also include issues of The Albany Anvil, the DSA's monthly newsletter, from May 1981 to December 1986 and documentation of UUP's support of labor struggles in the Capital District from 1986 to 1999. There is some information on Dr. Wittner's participation in other area groups such as the Labor– Religion Coalition and the Anti–Nuclear Alliance as well as work on the Leon Van Dyke, Ed Bloch and Nancy Burton political campaigns in the 1980s. The collection also contains twelve photographs of Dr. Wittner and some members of the DSA spanning from 1980–1985. Included are photos of demonstrations that took place under the auspices of these various groups and photos of an annual Eugene V. Debs Awards Dinner.