University Libraries.

Streaming Videos Demonstrate Psychotherapy Techniques

 So, you want to be a professional therapist. A degree from UAlbany is a great place to start! But how do you translate all that information and theory that you have learned about in class and from your reading into practical treatments that you can implement in your client sessions? Don’t you wish you could sit-in on real sessions to see how the pros make diagnoses, interact with and adjust to diverse patients, and implement treatments? The Libraries’ new resource, psychotherapy.net can help you do just that.

Psychotherapy.net is a library of training videos on a wide range of topics, from anger management and anxiety to depression and parenting. Videos, which include interviews and actual counseling sessions, are organized by topic, therapeutic approach, population, and counseling expert. Most videos are divided into sections, allowing for easy navigation. Each video is accompanied by a searchable, downloadable transcript. Clicking on a particular word or section on the transcript will automatically play the video from that point. You can even create clips from the videos and store them in the library. Many videos are also accompanied by a downloadable instructor’s manual that includes discussion questions, role-play exercises and suggested reactions papers.

For more information on this and other social welfare resources, contact subject specialist Elaine Lasda Bergman at elasdabergman@albany.edu or 442-3695.

Content created by Cary Gouldin. Picture from the Microsoft Clip Art Collection.

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