M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives

ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND POLICY

Finding Aid for the
STUDENT ASSOCIATION OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY (SASU) OF NEW YORK

RECORDS, 1970-1985
(APAP-046)

For reference queries contact M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives Reference staff

Finding Aid Compiled by
Jean Kemble
May 20, 1991







M. E. Grenander Department of Special Collections & Archives 
University Libraries / University at Albany / State University of New York 
1400 Washington Avenue / Albany, New York 12222 / (518) 437-3935


VOLUME: 17.5 cubic feet

ACQUISITION: All items in this manuscript group were donated to the University Libraries, M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, by the Student Association of the State University of New York in May 1981, January 1983, and May 1983.

ACCESS: Access to this record group is unrestricted.

COPYRIGHT: The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of copyright. Whenever possible, the M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives will provide information about copyright owners and other restrictions, but the legal determination ultimately rests with the researcher. Requests for permission to publish material from this collection should be discussed with the Head of Special Collections and Archives.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Administrative History

Scope and content note

Series Descriptions

Box and Folder List:


Student Association of the State University of New York
Administrative History

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The Student Association of the State University of New York (SASU) was established in the Summer of 1970 by five student governments in the State University of New York system.  There were several reasons for its establishment.  First, a new Chancellor, Dr. Ernest Boyer, had just been appointed without any meaningful student input into this decision.  Second, the State University of New York (SUNY) Board of Trustees was proposing to alter the rules governing the use of mandatory student fees without consulting with students.  Third, many students were alarmed at the response of SUNY Central to disruption on campus, and believed that a state-wide student organization was necessary to oppose the establishment of local campus hearing commissions for campus disruption.[1]  Finally, and perhaps most important, it should be noted that on college and university campuses across the nation, students were demanding that they be granted a greater role in the decision making processes on campus.  On many issues, ranging from the establishment of curricula to the leveling of fees and tuition, students were increasing their input into the administration of their institutions.  Thus SASU's creation should be seen in the context of the growing national student movement.

In October 1970, SUNY student government leaders gathered in Albany for the first plenary session of the newly incorporated Student Association of the State University of New York.  A steering committee had been formed, composed of three students, one from each of the State University Centers at Albany and Buffalo, and the State University College at Oswego.  Each of these schools had loaned money to SASU in order to have this first conference.  It was agreed that power within SASU was to be democratically vested in the membership, however conflicts arose over voting structure and membership dues were.  Community college delegates feared that most of the power in the organization would be concentrated with the representatives of the four year schools, and four-year state operated colleges were equally fearful of domination by the four-year University Centers.  A compromise was achieved apportioning delegate votes and membership dues according to both the number of students represented by a particular student government and the type of school.[2]  SASU delegates were to be responsible for conveying local campus issues and proposals to the Membership, and for reporting back to their local student government approved plans of action.[3]

At this meeting an Executive Committee was established, consisting of twelve people, elected from the membership, whose major responsibility was to carry out the dictates of the membership and to coordinate SASU activities.[4]  This committee would act as a steering committee and make policy decisions in the absence of the full Membership.[5]  It was decided that only seven rather than eight members were required for a quorum.[6]  Also at this first meeting the organization's by-laws were established, making SASU not only a political forum for students, but also a service organization.[7]  The student representatives recognized that if student governments were to be asked to pay between $1,000 and $6,000 to join, SASU would have to provide some concrete attractions such as savings in such areas as health insurance, block purchasing and entertainment contracting.[8]

Since SASU was a voluntary organization, and since it received no formal recognition from the University's Central Administration, most student governments were unwilling to commit funds during the first year.  Thus the officers devoted a great deal of time and energy to convincing these governments of both the political and economic advantages of student unity.  At the second meeting twenty schools were represented (although only five had paid dues).[9]

In 1971 SASU hired a full time Executive Director to based in Albany.  This Executive Director was to be responsible for the operation and the monitoring of activities in the Capitol.  This position was abolished within six months due to both conflicts with between the Executive Committee and Executive Director, and a lack of funds with which to pay for the position.[10]  In 1972, with the election of Mark Borenstein as chairperson of SASU, the functions of the Executive Director were assumed by the SASU chairperson (alternately known as the President).

At this time the Executive Committee adopted a statement of policy prescribing three major objectives for SASU.  First, provision of direct services to student governments and student government organizations.  Second, provision of direct services to students in the State University.  Third, the monitoring of policy organizations that administer SUNY and higher education in New York State in general, particularly the Central Administration, the State Education Department (Board of Regents) and the New York State Legislature.[11]  Four students were hired as part-time staff in the new Buffalo office to begin to implement the new priority mandates.

During 1972 the organization addressed the conflicts between the two and four year schools represented by SASU, and decided that membership should be restricted to campuses directly governed by the State University Board of Trustees, thereby barring community colleges which are governed by an independent board of trustees.[12]  At a later date the voting structure of the organization was also changed.  Member schools were to be represented by a student government President, and an at-large elected delegate for each 3,500 full-time equivalent students.[13]  At the June membership meeting regional offices were approved in New Paltz, Stony Brook, Potsdam, Geneseo, and Binghamton or Cortland.[14]  Finally in recognition that the organization needed to be effectively represented in the State capital, funds were provided for employing three full time staff and the Albany office was opened in September 1972.

As the membership of SASU continued to increase the functions of the organization expanded.  Committees were created in several areas to answer to the needs of the membership, including legislation, consumer services, communications, university affairs, and later in the decade minority and women's affairs.  In December/January 1973-74, SASU's Legislative Director was formally registered with the New York Secretary of State.[15]  At that moment SASU's legislative committee ceased simply monitoring and reporting news in the capitol, and began instead to lobby both State legislators and the Governor for student rights and interests, and to create a working relationship with SUNY Central, and the State Education Department.  The legislative committee kept the member schools abreast of pertinent legislation, via periodic reports and updates. Its annual legislative conferences provided a means for student representatives to discuss lobbying techniques, and also how to motivate students to make their opinions known to their legislators.  The legislative department of SASU has also maintained a student internship program.  Several of the interns later held the position of legislative director. The Campus Communications Office was responsible for sending out press releases, operating the State University News Network (SUNN) which provides campus media with regular news reporting of events throughout the state, and publishing UPDATE, a bi-monthly magazine and Communique, an in-house news update, and Grassroots, a state-wide newspaper (started in 1977).  The office also sponsored journalism conferences for SUNY newspaper staff.[16]

The Office of Student Affairs, also known as the Office of Information and Research or the Office of University Affairs, was created to maintain files on all issues affecting students, to keep abreast of SUNY Central decisions, to answer information requests from SUNY student governments and organizations, and to provide student input into SUNY Central decisions on such issues as FSA regulations, housing, and campus governance.[17]  The Office of Joint Services was established to offer buying cooperatives, insurance programs, concert block-booking, and other services to SUNY students.[18]

The State University Central Administration did not formally recognize SASU as a legitimate representative of SUNY students.  The Council of Student Association Presidents therefore suggested that another organization be created that would be recognized by the administration.  On April 25, 1973, after six months of intensive consultation with student representatives, the Board of Trustees approved the establishment of a State University Student Assembly, which would provide a formal structure "for consultation and the exchange of information between University students, the Chancellor, and the Board of Trustees, on matters of a University wide nature which affect student concerns."[19]

As defined by the Assembly's by-laws and articles, students from the State operated campuses would elect delegates to the Assembly on the basis of one delegate for each 3,500 full time equivalent students.  Assembly membership, would total sixty-six students of which eight would represent the community colleges.  Officers of the Assembly would be a chairperson and vice chairperson, elected annually by the campus representatives.  The Executive Committee of the Assembly would also be elected at large by the campus representatives.  This committee would act on behalf of the Assembly between regular meetings and would meet periodically with the Chancellor or his designee.  To become a functioning body, student leaders at three-fourths of the State operated campuses were required to ratify its provisions.  It was the understanding of the Council of Student Association Presidents and the campus student associations that the Student Assembly and SASU would co-exist as a dual organizational structure for representing the interests of State University students on a state-wide basis.[20]

The Student Assembly recognized the need for a University-wide student organization that was student funded and independent of University control.  In a resolution circa 1973, the Student Assembly pledged its support of SASU, and stated that it intended to cooperate with SASU on all matters of mutual interest.  To facilitate cooperation between the two organizations, SASU proposed that the representatives of SASU hold office in SASU by virtue of their office as representatives to the Student Assembly.[21]  Thus, despite identical personnel, SASU and the Student Assembly remained legally separate entities committed to working together towards influencing policy decisions of a State-wide nature which affect SUNY students.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notes

Back to History

1. "A Short SASU History," (Reprinted from 1972 Annual Report),  History folder, SASU Subject Files.
2. Ibid.
3. Untitled form letter describing SASU, History folder, SASU Subject Files.
4. "SASU Perspective", circa 1971, History folder, SASU Subject Files.
5. Untitled form letter describing SASU, circa 1975, History folder, SASU Subject Files.
6. Membership minutes, 5 December 1970.
7. "A Short SASU History," (Reprinted from 1972 Annual Report), History, SASU Subject Files.
8. Ibid.
9. "A Short SASU History," (Reprinted from 1972 Annual Report), History, SASU Subject Files.
10. Ibid.
11. Ibid.
12. Ibid.
13. Untitled form letter describing SASU, History folder, SASU Subject Files.
14. "A Short SASU History,"  (Reprinted from 1972 Annual Report), History folder, SASU Subject Files.
15. "SASU: Legislative Victories," pamphlet, circa 1979, History folder, SASU Subject Files.
16. Untitled document describing SASU's structure, ( undated), History folder, SASU Subject Files.
17. Untitled form letter describing SASU, circa 1975, History folder, SASU Subject Files.
18. Untitled document describing SASU, History folder, SASU Subject Files.
19. SUNY News Release. April 25, 1973, Public Relations Office, History folder, SASU Subject Files.
20. Ibid.
21. "Student Assembly Statement in Support of SASU", History folder, SASU Subject Files.


Student Association of the State University of New York
Scope & Content Note

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The bulk of the papers of the Student Association of the State University of New York cover the period 1970-1980.  The collection contains minutes of the Executive Committee, the Student Assembly, and the general membership meetings, executive and special committee members' correspondence with SUNY administrators, state legislators, and member schools, legislative proposals and reports, memos to state legislators, and SASU publications 1972-1985.  The records in this collection document the concerns of SUNY students during the 1970s, and the ways in which these concerns intersected with the general social, political, and economic climate during this decade.

During the early 1970s student protest against the lack of student input into the decision-making process on campus was very widespread.  The formation of SASU, while unusual because the organization attempted to unite students on many campuses, was nonetheless part of this general revolt against perceived student powerlessness.  The SASU records for 1970-73 provide a wealth of information about the organization's attempt to gain recognition by the SUNY administrators, in particular by the Chancellor and the Board of Trustees.  The creation of the Student Assembly in 1973 by these administrators as the bona fide body representing SUNY students, and the relationship between SASU and the Student Assembly are well documented in the Executive Committee minutes.  The materials for the early 1970s also contain information concerning the student protests against the involvement of the United States in Vietnam.

Throughout the decade SASU was involved in efforts to prevent both tuition hikes and decreases in student financial aid.  The collection contains much information about student protests and lobbying, organized by SASU, against State proposals to cut funds to higher education during the mid-late 1970s.  There is also information documenting SASU's attempts to ensure that the needs of minority students were voiced in the organization itself, as well as in the larger political arena.  In 1977, a Third World Caucus and a Women's Caucus were created to represent these minority groups at the annual membership meetings, and to answer to these particular students throughout the year.

SASU's correspondence with member schools illustrates the organization's early struggles to secure support at campuses which often believed that an organization based in Albany could not adequately represent their particular needs.  This correspondence also provides information about the ways in which SASU publicized its activities, and organized such projects as the voter registration drive in 1976.

Correspondence with State legislators illustrates how rapidly SASU's influence grew during this decade.  This increasing strength was due both to SASU's clarification of its purpose, as well as to the increase in its membership.  The records contain a wide variety of materials documenting the legislative concerns of the organization, including SASU's annual legislative agenda, memos to State legislators, information from the annual legislative conference, and periodic reports from SASU's legislative director.


Student Association of the State University of New York
Series Descriptions

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Series 1: Executive Committee Minutes, 1970-1980

This series contains a complete set of Executive Committee minutes documenting the relationship between SASU officers in Albany, and the member schools throughout the state of New York; the relationship between SASU and the Student Assembly; SASU's mission and the strategies used to achieve its goals; as well as the role the Executive Committee was to play in guiding the organization's development.  It is quite clear that in the early 1970s Executive Committee members devoted much time and energy towards gaining support in SUNY schools which often did not believe that their needs could be adequately be met by an organization based in the capital.  The series also contains minutes from the periodic Executive Committee retreats to reevaluate SASU's mission and the strategies necessary to achieve its goals, as well as the role the Executive Committee was to play in guiding the organization's development.  Of particular note  are two folders of legislative hearing statements and testimony given by SASU leaders both in Albany and Washington, D.C., on such issues as student unrest, 1972; financial aid (particularly the TAP program); open meetings, 1975; voter registration for students, 1976; and tuition.  The series is arranged chronologically.

Series 2: Student Assembly Minutes, 1973-1979

This series contains the minutes found in conference folders, correspondence, and documents being considered by both the Student Assembly Membership and Executive Committee.  The material illustrates the Student Assembly's relationship with both the SUNY administration and SASU.  The series also documents the expansion of the Student Assembly to provide a voice for organized student groups not effectively represented in the past, for example the Third World Caucus (1975-77), the Student Assembly's budget (1973-77), Affirmative Action conference, co-sponsored with SASU, (1975), Academic Affairs conference (1975), and Housing Task Force (1974-76). This series is arranged alphabetically and chronologically thereunder.

Series 3: Membership Meetings, 1970-1980

This series contains minutes, memo's, and notices relating to the Membership Meetings, and provides information about the work of the committees, and changes in the organization's articles.  The resolutions passed at these meetings illustrate the interests of the organization.  The series is arranged chronologically.

Series 4: Correspondence, 1970-1980

This series contains the correspondence of the SASU officers with SUNY administrators, state legislators, member schools, state and national student organizations, and student services providers.  The correspondence with both state legislators and the SUNY administrators illustrates the growing respect given to SASU, as this student organization increased not only its size, but also, perhaps more important, its political sophistication.  The correspondence with schools in the SUNY system documents SASU's struggle to gain the support of campuses throughout the state, the strategies used by SASU to publicize both its mission and its activities, and the continual budgetary constraints of both SASU and the member schools' student governments.  The series is arranged chronologically.

Series 5: Legislative Program, 1972-1980

This series documents the legislative concerns of the organization during the 1970s.  The series contains SASU's annual legislative agenda, memos to State legislators and SASU officers at member schools, information packets distributed at the annual legislative conference, and periodic legislative reports compiled by SASU's legislative director.  Since SASU did not start lobbying until December/January 1973-74, at which time it registered its legislative director with the New York State Secretary of State, most of the material covers the period 1974-80.  SASU was especially involved in lobbying for the passage of the following legislation:  mandatory provisions of absentee ballots, upon request, to eligible, unavoidably detained voters in primary elections (1974); the age of majority bill, lowering the age of majority from 21 to 18 (1974); the creation of the Tuition Assistance Program, (TAP), the nation's largest and most comprehensive student aid program (1974); mail voter registration (1975); a student trustee bill, drafted and initiated by SASU, which resulted in students becoming non-voting members on the SUNY Board of Trustees, the City University of New York Board of Higher Education, and on college and university councils and boards of trustees for all New York State's public colleges (this legislation was enacted despite strong opposition by many trustees and SUNY Central's legislative effort), (1975); the establishment of four students as voting members on the Higher Education Services Corporation's Board of Trustees, and four students on the HESC's Advisory Council, (the Board and the Advisory Council are responsible for determining administrative policies for HESC, which controls student financial aid), (1976); restoration of four of the five TAP programs cut in proposals by Governor Carey, (1976); the guarantee of all parliamentary rights, excluding the right to vote, for student members of the SUNY Board of Trustees, CUNY Board of Higher Education, and university and college councils for all public colleges, (these rights include, for example, the privileges of making and seconding motions, and attendance at executive sessions) (1977); marijuana decriminalization, preventing criminal penalties for the possession of small amounts of marijuana, (1977); an increase in the maximum allowable TAP eligible income, from $2,000 to $2,750 to allow for inflation, (1978); defeat of an attempt to cut off Medicaid funding for abortions, (1978); the repeal of the student health fee, (1979); and finally, after intensive lobbying by SASU, Student Trustees and student College Council members were granted the right to vote.  The series is arranged chronologically.

Series 6: Subject Files, 1970-1981

This series contains correspondence, internal and external SASU memos, information packets, press releases (1970-1980), reports relating to SASU's interests in student financial aid, in particular the Tuition Assistance Program, (1973-78), voter registration drives (1974-80), the SASU budget (1971-80), inter-collegiate athletics (1975-79), student services (1971-78), the Women's Caucus (1975-82), the Third World Caucus (1975-80), the organization of the SASU office in Albany (1973-81), student health services (1974-78), the State budget (1973-81), and the SUNY budget (1975-81).  The series is arranged alphabetically, and chronologically thereunder.

Series 7: Publications, 1972-1985

This series contains SASU's regular publications, Update (1972-77, 1981-85), and Grassroots, (1978-81), special issues such as the SASU Voter Information 1976, and People's University (1975), and a couple of issues of SASU Weekly, (1979).  It also contains posters of events organized or sponsored by SASU.  The series is arranged alphabetically.

Series 8: Political Posters, 1972-1980

This series includes posters used at rallies by members of SASU. Topics covered include presidential and gubernatorial candidates, opposition to the Vietnam War, support for the environment, anti-Apartheid sentiment, as well as other issues.


Student Association of the State University of New York
Box and Folder List

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Series 1: Executive Committee Minutes, 1970-1980

Box 1

Minutes 1970-75
Minutes, 1971
Minutes, 1972
Minutes, 1973
Memos, 1973
Minutes, 1974
Memos, 1974
Minutes, 1975
Memos, 1975
Business, 1975
Minutes, 1976
Memos, 1976
Budget, 1976-77
Minutes, 1977
Memos, 1977
Minutes, 1978
Minutes, 1979
Minutes, 1980
Memos, 1980
Minutes, 1981
Statements and Testimony, 1972-74
Statements and Testimony, 1975-80


Student Association of the State University of New York
Box and Folder List

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Series 2:  Student Assembly Minutes, 1973-1979

Box 1

Academic Affairs Conference, 1975
Academic Affairs Conference, undated
Affirmative Action, 1974
Affirmative Action Conference, 1975
Articles, 1974
Articles, 1975
Articles, undated
Budget, 1973
Budget, 1973-74
Budget, 1976-77
Budget, 1977
Budget, 1978-79
Business Meeting, 1979
By-Laws, 1973
Carnegie Unit System, 1976
Communications, 1976
Community Colleges, 1976-77
Community College Conference, 1980
Conferences, 1973
Conferences, 1974
Conferences, 1975
Conferences, 1976
Conferences, 1977
Conferences, 1978
Conferences, 1979
Conferences, 1980
Correspondence, 1979
Correspondence, 1980
Delegate Certification, 1977
Executive Committee, 1973
Executive Committee, 1974 (three folders)
Executive Committee, 1975
Executive Committee, 1976
Executive Committee, 1978
Executive Committee, 1980
Formation, 1973
Health Services, undated -11-
Higher Education Conference, 1974
Housing Task Force, 1974-76
Procedures, undated
Report, 1974
Report, 1977
Resolutions, 1974
Resolutions, 1977
Resolutions, undated
Rules Committee, 1980
Rules of Order, undated
Staff, 1973
Structure, 1974
Structure, 1977
Structure, 1978
Structure, 1980
Structure, undated
Third World Caucus, 1975
Third World Caucus (two folders), 1976
Third World Caucus, 1977
Third World Caucus, 1978-79
Third World Caucus, undated
Women's Caucus, By-Laws, undated
Women's Caucus, Conference, 1978-79 -12-


Student Association of the State University of New York
Box and Folder List

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Series 3: Membership Minutes, 1970-1980

Box 1

Minutes, 1970
Minutes, 1971
Minutes, 1972
Memos, 1973
Minutes, 1973
Resolutions, 1973
Minutes, 1974
Membership List, 1974
Minutes, 1975

Box 2

Memos, 1976
Minutes, 1976
Dues, 1976
Memos, 1977
Memos, 1978
Minutes, 1979
Minutes, 1980


Student Association of the State University of New York
Box and Folder List

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Series 4: Correspondence, 1970-1980

Box 1

Correspondence, 1970
Correspondence (four folders), 1971
Correspondence (five folders), 1972
Correspondence Chairperson, 1972-73
Correspondence Board of Trustees, 1972-76
Correspondence (thirteen folders), 1973
Correspondence Staff, 1973
Correspondence Chairperson, 1973
Correspondence (six folders), 1974

Box 2

Correspondence, (eight folders), 1974
Correspondence Staff, 1974-75
Correspondence (fourteen folders), 1975
Correspondence President, 1975
Correspondence Legislative Director (two folders), 1975

Box 3

Correspondence, (twelve folders), 1976
Correspondence President, 1976
Correspondence Executive Vice-President, 1976-77
Correspondence (seven folders), 1977
Correspondence President, 1977
Correspondence Vice President for Campus Affairs, 1977
Correspondence Communications Director, 1977
Correspondence Staff, 1977
Correspondence President, 1977-78
Correspondence 1977-79
Correspondence (five folders), 1978
Correspondence Executive Vice President, 1978
Correspondence Communications Director, 1978 -14-
Correspondence Executive Vice President, 1979
Correspondence Vice President for Campus Affairs, 1979
Correspondence President, 1979-80
Correspondence Organizing Director, 1979-80
Correspondence (six folders), 1980
Correspondence Communications Director, 1980
Correspondence (two folders), 1981
Correspondence Vice President for Campus Affairs, 1981
Correspondence 1983


Student Association of the State University of New York
Box and Folder List

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Series 5: Legislative Program, 1972-1980

 Box 1

Agenda, 1972
Conference, 1972
Correspondence, 1972
Legislative Reports, 1972

Agenda, 1973
Conference, 1973
Evaluations, 1973
Legislative Reports, 1973
Memos, 1973
Staff, 1973

Agenda, 1974
Conference, 1974
Legislative Reports, 1974
Memos to Legislature, 1974
Memos to Staff, 1974
Staff, 1974

Agenda, 1975
Conference, 1975
Correspondence, 1975
Glass, Ray, 1975
Legislative Reports, 1975
Memos to Legislature, 1975
Memos to Staff, 1975

Agenda, 1976
Conference, 1976
Correspondence, 1976
Legislative Reports, 1976
Memos to Legislature, 1976
Memos to Staff, 1976

Agenda, 1977
Bill Sheets, 1977
Conference, 1977
Legislative Reports, 1977
Memos to Legislature, 1977
Memos to Staff, 1977
General, 1978
Memos to Legislature, 1978

Box 2

Agenda, 1979
Conference, 1979
Correspondence, 1979
Legislative Reports, 1979
Memos, 1979
Agenda, 1980
Conference, 1980
General, 1980
Memos, 1980
Agenda, 1981


Student Association of the State University of New York
Box and Folder List

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Series 6: Subject Files, 1970-1981

Box 1

Absentee Ballots, 1977
Academic Grievance, 1972
Accounts, 1975-1976
Accounts, 1975-76
Accounts, 1978-79
Accounts, 1980
Activities Fee, 1962-80
Affirmative Action, 1974
Affirmative Action, 1975
Affirmative Action, 1977
Annual Reports, 1975?80
Annual Report, 1977
Apartheid, 1979
Application for Authority, 1973
Athletics Conference, 1979
Bakke Case, 1978
Basic Educational Opportunity Grants, 1976
Bill of Rights, 1972
Bill of Rights, undated
Boyer Case, undated
Boyer Interview, 1974
Brodsky, Howard, 1979
Budget, 1970?1981
By-Laws, 1970 1973, 1974?75 1975?77 1977
Campus Affairs, 1976?77
Campus Affairs, 1979?80
Campus Coordinators, 1974?75
Campus Justice, undated
Campus Security, 1974
Campus Unrest, 1969
Cards, undated
Carey/Samuels, 1974?75
Carey, Hugh L., 1974
Community College Student Association, 1976, 1977, 1978
Censorship, 1974
Collective Bargaining, 1971-73

Box 2
Collective Bargaining, 1974-77
Collective Bargaining, 1975-76
Committees, 1975
Committee on Organization, 1976-78
Committee Structure, 197375
Communications, 1972-75
Communications, 1973-74
Communications, 1973-78
Communications, 1974-76
Communications, 1975
Communications, 1975-78
Communications, 1976
Communications, 1979
Communications, 1980
Communications Conference, 1974
Communications Network, 1971
Community College, 1971-75
Community College, 1976
Conferences, 1973-77
Conferences, 1974-76
Conferences, 1974-78
Conferences, 1975
Conferences, 1977
Conference Procedure, 1975
Constitution, undated
Contract Rider, 1972
Coordinators, 1975
Credit Hours, 1974
CUNY, 1975
Delegate Lists, 1977-1981
Democratic Platform, 1975
Directories, 1974-76
Disabled Students, 1976
Debts Due, 1980
Dormitory Rent, undated
Dormitories, 1980
Election Law, 1976
Entertainment, 1974-75
Entertainment,1975-76
EOP/AA, [1978] EOP, 1979
ERA, 1970?73
Faculty Tenure, 1974
Federal Election, 1976
Fees,1976
Fees, Fines, and Deposits, 1972
Financial Aid, 1973
Financial Aid, 1974
Financial Aid, 1975
Financial Aid, 1978
Financial Aid, undated
Financial Statements, 1977
Financial Statements, 1978
Faculty Student Association, 1975
Faculty Student Association, 1978
Faculty Student Association, undated
Foundation, 1973
Foundation, undated
Glass, Ray, 1975
Glass, Foundation, 1975

Box 3
Glass, Ray, Organizing Conference, 1978
Glass, Ray, Organizing Conference, 1979
Glass, Ray, Organizing Conference, 1981
Glass, Ray, Organizing Conference, undated
Governance, 1970?73
Graduate Student Aid,1973?75
Guaranteed Student Loans, 1976
Health Fee, 1975
Health Fee, undated
Health Services, 1974
Health Services, 1975-77
Health Services, 1976-77
Health Services, 1976-78
Henderson Commission, (three folders), 1969-73
Henderson Law, 1971
Higher Education Services Corporation, (two folders), 1975-77
History, 1970-1988
Housing, 1980
Illinois, SGA, 1973?75
Incorporation, 1971-74
Incorporation, 1974-75
Incorporation, 1979
Incorporation, undated
Independent Students, 1973
Infiltration, 1975
Information Clearinghouse, 1974
Intercollegiate Athletics, 1975
Intercollegiate Athletics, (two folders), 1978
Intercollegiate Athletics, 1978-79
Internship Program, 1973-77
Internship Program, 1975-76
Journal, undated
Leadership Conference, 1979
Lease,1973
Leave of Absence, 1975-78
Leave of Absence, 1977
University of California, 1973-74
Lobbying, 1975-78
Mandatory Activity Fee, 1971-74
Marijuana Decriminalization, 1977
Media, (two folders), 1973
Media Conference, 1974
Media Conference, 1977
Media Conference, 1980

Box 4

Memorabilia, undated
Minority Affairs, 1979
Minority Caucus, undated
National Education Association, 1973-74
National Student Lobby, 1971,
National Student Lobby Conference, 1975
New York City, 1975
New York State Financial Aid Administrators Conference, 1974
Newspaper Clippings, 1977-78
Newspaper Clippings, 1978-79
Newspaper Clippings, (College), 1979
Office (Albany), (twenty two folders), 1973-81
Officers and Coordinators Conference, 1976
Officers Conference, 1975-77
Officers Conference, 1976
Officers Conference, (two folders), 1977
Officers Conference, undated
Organization, undated
Organizers Training Conference, undated
Organizing, 1975-78
Organizing, 1976
Organizing Committee, 1979
Organizing Conference, undated
Organizing Department, 1974-77
Operation Rollback, undated

Box 5

Overview, 1971
Personnel, 1973-76
Piche, Dianne, 1973
Planning Meeting, 1978
Platform, (two folders), 1972
Platform, (two folders), 1976
Platform, undated
Political and Financial Issues Conference, 1976
Poem, undated
President and Vice Presidents Conference, 1974
Press Releases, (twenty boxes), 1970-1980
Recruitment, 1974
Regionalism, 1972
Regional Offices, 1972-74
Rent Hike Protest, 1982
Reports, 1973-77
Reports, 1979
Reports, undated
Research Department, 1973-78
Resolutions, 1971
Resolutions, (two folders), 1973-75
Resolutions, 1975
Restructuring Committee, (two folders), 1977-78
Restructuring Committee, 1978
Restructuring, 1980
Right to Privacy, 1974-75
Rules Committee, 1976

Box 6

SAT, 1976
Sex Discrimination, 1975
Sexual Harassment, undated
State Budget, 1973-81
State Elections, 1974
State Elections, 1976
State Elections, 1978
State Financial Crisis, (two folders), 1975-76
State Master Plan, (five folders), 1972
State Politics, 1976
State Work Study, [1975]
Statements, 1974
Stony Brook Sewerage, 1976-77
Student Activity Fees, 1973-81 (two folders)
Student Activity Fees, 1974-75
Student Bill of Rights, 1972
Student Assembly Articles, 1973
Student Assembly, establishment, 1973
Student Entertainment, 1974-75
Student Evaluations, 1974
Student Government, 1977-80
Student Government Directory, 1975-78
Student Government Directory, 1977-78
Student Governance, 1975
Student Loans, 1975
Student Movement, 1975-78
Student Rights Workshop, undated

Box 7

Student Services, (thirty six folders), 1971-78

Box 8

Student Trustees, 1973
Student Trustees, 1980-82
Student Unionization, 1976-77
SUC, Utica/Rome, 1973
SUNY Board of Trustees, 1975-79
SUNY Budget, (nine folders), 1975-81,
SUNY Buffalo, 1977
SUNY Central Administration, 1977
SUNY Construction, undated
SUNY Construction and Debt Service, 1977
SUNY Old Westbury, undated
Survey, 1980
SASU/SUNY Review, undated
TAP (Tuition Assistance Program), (nine folders), 1973-78
Taxation, 1974
Teacher Evaluation, 1973-75
Text Book Sales Tax, 1975
Third World Caucus, (six folders), 1975-79
Third World Delegates, 1975
Toll, John, 1970-71
Transfer Credits, undated
Treasurers Conference, (two folders), 1975
Tuition, (fourteen folders), 1972-79

Box 9

Tuition, (five folders), 1979-80
Tuition Increase, undated
Unionization, (three folders) 1975-78,
United States Student Association, 1972
University Affairs Report, 1976
University of California, 1973-75
University Services, 1972
University Student Senate, 1972
Utilities, undated
Voting (State), 1974-75
Voter Registration, (fifteen folders), 1974-80
Vietnam, (five folders), 1970-71
Wessell Commission, (three folders), 1977-78
Women's Caucus, (eleven folders), 1975-82


Student Association of the State University of New York
Box and Folder List

Back to table of contents

Series 7: Publications, 1972-1985

Box 1

Grassroots, 1978-1980
People's Unbiversity, 1975
People's Weekly, 1979
SASU Update, 1972-1977, 1981-1985
SASU Voter Information, 1976


Student Association of the State University of New York
Box and Folder List

Back to table of contents

Series 8: Political Posters, 1972-1980

"Abolish Laws That Murder Women," January 20, 1979
"The Student Association of The State University of New York Money Problems," undated
"The Student Association of The State University of New York Reciprocity of Student Activities," undated
"Defend Public Higher Education," undated
"Health Fee To Be Repealed SASU," undated
"March and Lobby Jobs for Youth," undated
"Fight The Hike! SASU ," 1981
"Support A Strong Statewide Student Voice SASU," undated
"Will you be able to Afford a SUNY Education?, " 1984
"SASU Foundation Internship Program," undated
"SASU Tripled Rooms," undated
"Education is our Right 540,000 Students is Our Might Students Unite" undated
"SASU Entertain," 1975-76
"The Student Voice Rally on The Capital," March 19, 1979
"SASU: Can we afford to do without it?," undated
"Isn't it About time the Board of Trustees had a few Students SASU," undated
"All members of the University have equal rights and privileges right? Wrong. Some of us are students. SASU," undated
"Sharon Ward an Experienced Leader Student Association President," undated
"SASU Studentrek," 1975
"Rally on The Capital Stop The Tuition Increase," March 21, 1979
"The United States Student Association Certifies SASU as a member of the Association," February 6, 1981
"SASU Recognition For All Of Us Now," undated
"Student Population 1950 - 1980,"
"55,000 voters won't make it to the polls this year," 1972 Universities National Anti War Fund
"Let People Live Support The Peoples Peace Treaty," undated
"Make Your Own Peace," North South Vietnam Fund undated
"Operation Dewey Canyon 3," Vietnam Veterans Against the War
"Orange Composition," Support for the NLF and the Vietnamese People
"Phase 1: Nixon Eviction," undated
"Pull Him Out Now," Anti War Rally, April 24, undated
"We The People Declare Peace," undated
"You May Fool All The People Some Of The Time...," March On Washington, Anti-War Rally, April 24, undated
"March 24: International Day of Solidarity With...Portugal," undated
"National Week Of Action In Support Of African Liberation Movements," April 4-11, undated
"The Mass'ah Is Alive And Well In South Africa," undated
"National Student Lobby, Congressional Record," 1973
"March On Washington For A Non Nuclear World," April 26 1975 or 1980
"If Your Doctor Signs On The Left Side Ask Why," NYPIRG, undated
"McGovern For President," 1972
"Hands That Pick Cotton Now Can Pick Our Public Officials," [1976]
"Remember In November: Vote," CCSA, [1976]
"How Far Will You Go?" Save SUNY, Jan. 29, 1974 or 1980
"Hundreds Of Jobs Are Hanging By A Thread," Save SUNY, Jan. 29, 1974 or 1980
"The Blade Is About To Fall," Save SUNY, Jan 29, 1974 or 1980
"Remember Me Remember The Stevens Workers," undated
"Support Justice For Textile Workers," undated
"Testimony: Justice vs J.P. Stevens," May 17, 1977
"Saving Energy, Saving Jobs: Hugh Carey, Governor, undated
"Support Mother Earth," Rally May 14, undated
"Stop Baby Bottle Disease, Clip Nestle Quik," undated
"Fed Up With Inflation: Send Your Bills To Congress," undated
"Take the Health Fee Out of the SUNY Budget,"
"Board of Trustees 5 Million in TAP Adjustments" "Board of Trustees 5 Million in TAP Adjustments"
"Vote Libertarian: Clark, President" Bumper Sticker, [1976]
"Say No To Gallo," Bumper Sticker, undated
"Fred Harris For President," Bumper Sticker, 1976
"Roll Back Tuition SUNY Alive, Open, and Free," Bumper Sticker


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Last updated January 2, 2007