M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives

GERMAN AND JEWISH INTELLECTUAL ÉMIGRÉ COLLECTION

Finding Aid for the
ALFRED C. OPPLER
PAPERS, 1908-82

(GER-016)


 

For reference queries contact Grenander Department Reference staff or (518)-437-3935

Finding Aid Compiled by
Bonita L. Weddle
July 1, 1999

Revised by
Sandra Hunt Hawrylchak
October 2005



 
 
 
 
 
 

M. E. Grenander Department of Special Collections & Archives 
University Libraries / University at Albany / State University of New York 
1400 Washington Avenue / Albany, New York 12222 / (518) 437-3935


VOLUME: 2.75 cubic ft.

ACQUISITION: The materials in this collection were donated to the M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives by Ellen C. Oppler in 1982. Correspondence between Oppler and Walther Buchholz was added to the collection by Gregory Lubkin in 2006.

ACCESS: Access to this record group is unrestricted.

COPYRIGHT: The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of copyright. Whenever possible, the M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives will provide information about copyright owners and other restrictions, but the legal determination ultimately rests with the researcher. Requests for permission to publish material from this collection should be discussed with the Head of Special Collections and Archives.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Biographical Sketch

Chronolgy of Events

Scope and Content Note

Series Descriptions

Box and Folder List


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Biographical Sketch

Alfred Christian Oppler was born in Alsace-Lorraine (then part of Germany) on February 19, 1893.  His father, a judge, and mother were Jewish converts to Christianity, and he was raised a Protestant.  He attended a Gymnasium and then studied law at universities in Munich, Freiburg, Berlin, and Strasbourg.  He served in the German Army from 1914-18, saw combat at Ypres and Verdun, and rose to the rank of lieutenant. While on leave in 1915, he passed the first of two examinations required for admission to the German bar.

After the First World War ended, Alsace-Lorraine became French territory.  Oppler's family was among the many ethnic German households forced out of the area.  The family moved to Berlin, where Oppler completed the second examination required for admission to the German bar and practiced law for a short period of time.  In 1922, he became an assistant judge with the German Ministry of Justice.  In 1923, he was transferred to the Ministry of Finance, where for the next four years he served as legal advisor to the officials charged with brokering a financial settlement between the German government and the dethroned Hohenzollern family.  He married Charlotte Preuss, a teacher and Berlin University graduate student, in 1927; their only child, Ellen, became an art historian at Syracuse University.

Between 1927 and 1930, Oppler worked as a research assistant at the Prussian Supreme Administrative Court (Oberwaltungsgericht).  He then served for a year as a superior counselor (Oberiegierungrat) of the regional government at Potsdam.  In 1931, he was appointed associate justice of the Supreme Administrative Court (Oberverwaltungsgericht); thirty-eight years old at the time of his appointment, he was the youngest person ever to hold the position.  A year later, he became vice president of the Supreme Disciplinary Court (Dienststafhof).  After the  rise to power of Adolf Hitler, his career suffered. In 1933, he was demoted to a provincial position in Cologne.   Defined as a Jew under the provisions of the 1935 Nuremberg Laws, he was cast out of the civil service.  After Kristallnacht (November 9, 1938), he and his wife, who was defined as "Aryan," decided to emigrate to the United States.  Oppler, whose birth in Alsace-Lorraine enabled him to come to the United States under the French immigration quota, was able to leave in March 1939 and settled with relatives in Brookline, Massachusetts.  His wife and daughter followed several months later.

The Opplers settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  Charlotte Preuss Oppler received an M.A. in education from Harvard in 1943.  Alfred Oppler taught German at a Berlitz school and between 1940 and 1944 worked as a Harvard University research assistant and instructor.  In 1944, he took a post with the Foreign Economic Administration in Washington, D.C.; the agency's functions were transferred to the War Department after V-J Day, and Oppler spent a few months working for the department.

In early 1945 Alfred and Charlotte Preuss Oppler became United States citizens.  Later that year, Alfred Oppler was asked to join the Far Eastern Division of the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers (SCAP).  Upon his arrival in early 1946, he was assigned to the Governmental Powers Branch of the Government Section and had a minor role in the drafting of Japan's new constitution.  In early 1947, he was made head of the newly formed Courts and Law Division, which was transferred to the Legal Section on June 1, 1948.  In this capacity, he cultivated ties to Chief Justice of the Supreme Court Tanaka Kotaro and other prominent Japanese jurists and played a key part in reforming Japan's judicial system and civil law codes.  An ardent civil libertarian, he also helped to establish the Japan Civil Liberties Union.

The SCAP was dissolved in April 1952, when the Allied Powers' peace treaty with Japan went into effect, but Oppler remained with the G-5 (later J-5) unit within the Far East Command (FEC).  He served as chief of the Political and Legal Section within the Governmental Affairs Branch. The FEC was disbanded in 1957, but Oppler joined the newly-created United States Forces Japan (USFJ) and served as its International Relations Officer; according to his memoirs, he spent much of his time with the FEC and the USFJ drafting reports analyzing political developments in Japan, the Ryukyu Islands, and Korea.

Oppler retired to the United States in 1959 but remained actively interested in Japanese law, politics, and society.  He attended numerous academic conferences dedicated to the study of Asian law, wrote several articles on the Japanese legal system, and in the 1970s wrote a memoir, Legal Reform in Occupied Japan: A Participant Looks Back.  He spoke repeatedly about Japanese-United States relations, delivering his last public address a week before his death on April 24, 1982.  He also remained committed to the defense of civil liberties and outspokenly supported numerous liberal political causes, among them passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, abolition of the death penalty, and legalized abortion. 1893:  Alfred Christian Oppler is born to a middle-class family in Alsace-Lorraine, then part of Germany.


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Chronology of Events

1914:  Oppler breaks off his legal studies and enlists in the German Army.  He sees combat at Ypres, Verdun, and other places and rises to the rank of lieutenant.

1915: While on leave, Oppler passes the first of two examinations required for admission to the German bar.

1918:  Forced out of Alsace-Lorraine, Oppler's family settles in Berlin.

1918-22:  Oppler completes his legal studies, serves his three-year term as a judicial apprentice (Referendar).

1922: Oppler passes the second examination (Assessor) required for admission to the German bar.  He practices law for a brief period of time and then accepts a position with the German Ministry of Justice.

1924-27: On behalf of the Ministry of Finance, Oppler works as legal advisor on the financial settlement between the German government and the dethroned Hohenzollern family.

1927:  Oppler marries teacher and graduate student Charlotte Preuss.

1927-30: Oppler works as a research assistant at the Prussian Supreme Administrative Court (Oberwaltungsgericht).

1930-31: Oppler serves as superior counselor of the regional government (Regierung) in Potsdam.

1931:  Oppler becomes an associate justice of the Supreme Administrative Court (Oberverwaltungsgericht).

1932:  Oppler becomes vice-president of the Supreme Disciplinary Court (Dienststafhof).  He continues to serve as associate justice of the Supreme Administrative Court.

1933: Owing to his Jewish ancestry, Oppler is demoted to a provincial position in Cologne.
(The National Socialist government purged the German civil service of most people it defined as Jewish, but until 1935 it made exceptions for Oppler and other combat veterans of the First World War.)

1935: In accordance with the Nuremberg Laws, Oppler is removed from the civil service.

1939:  Oppler emigrates to the United States in March 1939; his wife and daughter follow several months later.

1940-44:  Oppler works as a Harvard University research assistant and as instructor at its School for Overseas Administration.

1944:  Oppler takes a position with the U.S. Foreign Economic Administration in Washington, D.C.

1945:  Oppler becomes a United States citizen.  In late summer, the Foreign Economic Administration is merged with the War Department, for which Oppler works for several months.

1946:  Oppler arrives in Tokyo in January and is assigned to the Government Section of the Far Eastern Division of the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP).

1947:  Oppler becomes head of the newly established Courts and Legal Division.

1950:  Oppler leads a delegation of Japanese Supreme Court Justices on a tour of the United States.

1952:  The occupation of Japan ends in April and the SCAP is dissolved.  Oppler joins the G-5 (later J-5) newly established Far Eastern Command (FEC) and becomes chief of the Political and Legal Section within the Governmental Affairs Branch.

1957:  The FEC is dissolved and Oppler becomes International Affairs Officer for the newly established United States Forces Japan.

1959:  Oppler retires and returns to the United States, settling in Hightstown, New Jersey.

1972:  Oppler begins work on his memoirs of his experiences in Japan.

1976:  Legal Reform in Occupied Japan: A Participant Looks Back is published.

1982:  Oppler suffers a fatal heart attack one week after giving a speech on Japanese-United States relations.


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Scope and Content Note

This collection consists of professional correspondence, legal and scholarly writings, and research materials that Alfred C. Oppler created or collected while living and working in the United States and Japan.  It best documents his work as a Harvard University research assistant and instructor and his activities as a civilian legal expert attached to the Far Eastern Division of the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (1946-52), the Far Eastern Command (1952-57), and the United States Forces Japan (1957-59).  Scholars interested in the occupation of Japan, the Japanese legal system, and the security agreements between the governments of Japan and the United States may find the collection to be of considerable value.  Researchers may also be interested in Oppler's unpublished notes generated by a committee of scholars funded by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and charged with planning the postwar reconstruction of Germany.

The collection contains scant documentation of Oppler's career as a jurist in Weimar Germany.  As were many other Germans defined as Jewish under the terms of the Nuremberg Law, he was compelled to leave behind most of his belongings when he left the country.  Consequently, the only documents in the collection that shed light upon his life and work in Germany are the unpublished autobiographical essays he wrote after his arrival in the United States.  Additional information about Oppler's life and work in Germany is contained in the introductory chapter of his memoir, Legal Reform in Occupied Japan: A Participant Looks Back (Princeton University Press, 1976); however, the collection contains only a few typescript passages that did not appear in the published version of the book.

Apart from a photocopy of a volume of poems written by Oppler's father and a small amount of correspondence with, newspaper clippings annotated by, and materials pertaining to the professional activities of Oppler's daughter Ellen, the collection also lacks information about Oppler's family life.

Oppler corresponded with a number of prominent people, among them Lieutenant General Paul Caraway (September 25, 1974, in the Legal Reform in Occupied Japan series), United States Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (October 23, 1974, in the Legal Reform in Occupied Japan series), political scientist Ernst Fraenkel (January 16, 1943-April 27, 1943, in the Harvard University Series) and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Lyman L. Lemnitzer (September 22, 1960, in the Miscellaneous Writings series).  Thomas Blakemore, Kurt Steiner, and Justin Williams, all of whom worked with Oppler in Japan, were Oppler's most frequent correspondents. One highlight is a circa 1950 collection of statistics on occupied Japan published by the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers.

All newsprint materials in the collection, including several published by the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, have been photocopied for preservation purposes.  Users should be aware that Oppler segregated almost all correspondence generated while working with the SCAP and the FEC and while writing Legal Reform in Occupied Japan and entries for The Encyclopedia of Japan and kept it with other papers pertaining to these activities.  This arrangement has been preserved.


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Series Descriptions

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1908-1982.  .05 cu.ft.  Arranged  chronologically.

This series contains materials that shed light upon Oppler's personal and professional life.  Included are a photocopy of a book of poems authored by Oppler's father Leo, photographs, and photocopies of his published obituaries.  Also included are a handful of materials documenting his daughter Ellen's career as an art historian.

Series 2: Harvard University, 1940-1944.  .60 cu.ft.  Arranged chronologically within subseries.

This series contains published and unpublished writings, research and lecture notes, and research materials generated or collected while Oppler was a research assistant (1940-44) and instructor at the School for Overseas Administration (1941-44).

Subseries 1: Writings, 1941-1944.  .30 cu.ft.

This subseries contains typescript and published articles, essays, and lecture notes. Of note are correspondence with social scientist Ernst Fraenkel, a circa 1941 autobiographical essay entitled "Mein Leben in Deutschland vor und nach dem 30. December 1933," typescript and published versions of "Ethics in Public Administration and Individual Ethics," and "Prussian Bureaucracy and National Socialism," a lengthy and unpublished analysis of the Prussian civil service in Imperial, Weimar, and Nazi Germany.

Subseries 2: Notes, circa 1940-1944.  .25 cu.ft.

The class notes and syllabi in this subseries were generated in connection with several courses in public administration that Oppler took, but most of the materials in this subseries consist of reading notes taken while he was researching "Prussian Bureaucracy and National Socialism."  Oppler housed his research notes in sequentially numbered three-ring binders.  This order was preserved and folder notations indicate the notebook in which each group of documents was placed; in several instances, loose documents produced at a later date were removed and placed in the Writings or Research Materials subseries.

Subseries 3: Research Materials, 1942-1943.  .05 cu.ft.

This subseries contains mimeographed articles distributed by the School for Overseas Administration, a 1942 pamphlet published by the International Rescue and Relief Committee, and unpublished materials generated by a Carnegie Endowment-supported committee charged with planning Germany's political reconstruction; Oppler may have been a member of the committee, but the extent of his involvement is unclear.

Series 3: Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, 1946-1952.  .50 cu.ft.  Arranged chronologically within subseries.

This series contains reports, memoranda, speeches, articles, photographs, Japanese government documents and other materials that Oppler created or gathered while working for the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP). The earliest items concern the Japanese constitution, which Oppler played a very minor role in drafting.  However, the bulk of the series consists of published and unpublished memoranda, reports, meeting minutes, speech notes, photographs, and other materials Oppler created or collected while working as part of the Government Section (1946-47) and as head of the Courts and Law Division (1947-52).

Series 4: Far Eastern Command, G-5/J-5 Section, 1952-1957.  .075 cu.ft.  Arranged chronologically.

This series consists of unpublished notes and opinions, photographs, and other documents Oppler created or collected while working as head of the Political and Legal Section of the Far Eastern Command.  Of note is an autographed photograph of General Lyman L. Lemnitzer.

Series 5:  United States Forces Japan, 1952-1959.  .15 cu.ft.  Arranged chronologically.

This series consists of unpublished opinions, memoranda, official documents, photographs, and press summaries that Oppler generated or collected while serving as the International Relations Officer of the United States Forces Japan (USFJ).  Of note are Oppler's "Personal Interest File," which contains clippings, USFJ memoranda and reports, and other documents concerning the affairs of Japan, Korea, and the Ryukyu Islands, and his file of clippings and documents concerning the Sunakawa case, which upheld the constitutionality of stationing United States troops in Japan.

Series 6: Legal Reform in Occupied Japan, 1972-1977.  .15 cu.ft.  Arranged chronologically.

This series contains documents generated in connection with Oppler's memoir, Legal Reform in Occupied Japan: A Participant Looks Back (Princeton University Press, 1976), including correspondence, reviews, and readers' notes.  Of note are several typescript passages about life in Japan that were excised from the final version and a brief note from Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (October 23, 1974).

Series 7: Encyclopedia of Japan, circa 1977-1982. .075 cu.ft. Arranged chronologically.

This series contains documents generated in connection with Oppler's writing and editorial work for the Encyclopedia of Japan (Kodansha, 1980), among them Oppler's entries on the 1961 Sunakawa Case and the Japan-U.S. Security Treaties, an entry that he helped to content-edit, and an entry written by Kurt Steiner concerning Oppler's work in Japan.  Also included are newsletters published by the staff of the Encyclopedia of Japan; the Spring 1979 issue contains a poem that Oppler wrote in praise of the project.

Series 8: Miscellaneous Writings, 1948, 1960-1982. .40 cu.ft. Arranged chronologically within subseries.

This series consists of correspondence, research notes, speech notes, and published and unpublished articles and essays that Oppler produced or gathered after his 1959 retirement and return to the United States.

Subseries 1: Correspondence, 1943-1981. .05 cu.ft.

This subseries contains correspondence with Thomas Blakemore, Kurt Steiner, Justin Williams, and other people Oppler worked with while in Japan. Other letters concern various interviews with scholars and journalists and various political causes that Oppler supported.  Of note is a letter from Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Lyman L. Leminitzer (September 22, 1960). Oppler segregated almost all correspondence generated while working with the SCAP and the FEC and while writing Legal Reform in Occupied Japan and entries for The Encyclopedia of Japan and kept it with other papers pertaining to these activities.  This arrangement has been preserved.

Subseries 2: Articles and Speeches, 1961-1982.  .20 cu.ft.

This subseries contains articles and speech notes Oppler wrote after retiring. Of particular interest are his analysis of the Sunakawa Case, in which the Japanese Supreme Court ruled that Japan's constitutional ban on rearmament did not prohibit the stationing of U.S. troops on Japanese soil, and notes for a speech that he gave a week before his death.

Subseries 3: Notes, 1948-1973.  .15 cubic ft. This subseries consists of research notes that Oppler wrote after his retirement; newspaper clippings, among them a 1948 issue of the Pacific Stars and Stripes, are sometimes interspersed.  Some of Oppler's research may have been undertaken in preparation for the writing of Legal Reform in Occupied Japan: A Participant Looks Back, but some of the  notes concern German and American law, society, and politics.

Series 9: Research Materials, 1944-1982.   .70 cu.ft.  Arranged chronologically within subseries.

This series contains materials that Oppler received from colleagues, gathered while at various Asian studies conferences, or kept for their informational value.

Subseries 1: Presentation Copies, 1961-1980.  .05 cu.ft.

This subseries contains inscribed copies of published and unpublished articles written by Kurt Nadelmann, Ulrich Mache, and Josef Derbolav, all of whom apparently met Oppler before 1939, Marius Jansen, Kurt Steiner, and Justin Williams, all of whom worked with Oppler in Japan, and Nitsuke Ando, whom Oppler evidently met while; residing in Japan.

Subseries 2: Conference Documents, 1961-1980.  .25 cu.ft.

This subseries consists of materials that Oppler collected while attending various conferences concerning the study of Japan.  Of particular interest are numerous unpublished papers concerning various aspects of Japanese law.

Subseries 3: Articles and Reference Works, 1944-1982.   .40 cu.ft.

This subseries contains articles, pamphlets, and clippings that Oppler kept because of their informational value.  Oppler may have gathered the earliest documents in thissubseries, which consist of newspaper articles concerning France, Germany, Japan, and Poland during the final years of the Second World War, in connection with his work for the United States Economic Administration and the Department of War.  All of the other documents in this subseries were collected after his 1959 return to the United States. Some of these materials may have been assembled  in preparation for the writing of Legal Reform in Occupied Japan.


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1908-1982

Box 1
Folder

1. Leo Oppler (Father of Alfred Oppler), Gedichte, circa 1908
2. Unidentified Photograph, 1940
3. Photograph of Alfred Oppler, 1975
4. Professional Activities of Ellen Oppler, 1977
     Contains material housed in flat file.
5. Memorial Service Program and Obituaries, 1982
     Contains material housed in oversized folder.


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 2: Harvard University, 1940-1944
Subseries 1: Writings, 1941-1944

Box 1 (continued)
Folder

6. "A Contribution to the Problem of Service Ethics" (unpub.), 1941
7. "German Civil Service Before Hitler and After" (pub.), 1941
8. "Ein Beitrag zum Problem der Berufsethik im Beamentum" (unpub.), circa 1941
9. "Mein Leben in Deutschland vor und nach dem 30. Januar 1933" (unpub.), circa 1941?
10. "Ethics in Public Administration and Individual Ethics" (unpub.), 1942
11. "Ethics in Public Administration and Individual Ethics" (pub.), 1942
12. "Prussian Bureaucracy and National Socialism" (unpub.), circa 1942
13. "Bemerkungen zu dem ersten Entwurf des Gutachens" (unpub.), 1943
14. "And the German Refugees" (unpub.), circa 1943
15. "Remarks on the Outline Concerning the Future Study of International Relations at
 Harvard" (unpub.), circa 1943
16. Memo to Professor Merle Fainsod and Notes for Lectures (unpub.), 1943-circa 1944
17. Notes for First Lecture, School for Overseas Administration, circa 1944


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 2: Harvard University, 1940-1944
Subseries 2: Notes, circa 1940-1944

Box 2
Folder

1. Syllabi, Background Materials, and Lecture and Reading Notes, circa 1940-41
2. Notes on German Literature and History (Notebook I), circa 1942
3. Notes on the Legal Status of Liberated France, circa 1944
4. Notes on Feudalism (Notebook I), circa 1942
5. Notes on Prussian History (Notebook I), circa 1942
6. Notes on the German Civil Service Before 1918 (Notebook I), circa 1942
7. Notes on the Civil Service in the Weimar Republic (Notebook I), circa 1942
8. Unsorted Notes on German History and Government (Notebook II), circa 1942
      Contains material housed in oversized folder.
9. Notes on German Literature (Notebook II), circa 1942
10. Notes on National Socialism "In General" (Notebook II), circa 1942
11. Notes on Nazi Bureaucracy (Notebook II), circa 1942
12. Notes on Civil Service in Various Countries (Notebook II), circa 1942


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 2: Harvard University, 1940-1944
Subseries 3: Background Materials, 1942-circa 1943

Box 2 (continued)
Folder

13. International Rescue and Relief Committee, Two Years Against the Gestapo, 1942
14. Shartel and Wolff, "Sketch of the German Legal System" (unpub.), 1942
15. Van der Bruck, "Germany's Third Empire" (unpub.), 1943
16. Materials Generated by Carnegie Endowment-Funded Committee on German Disarmament, circa 1943


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 3: Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, 1946-1952

Box 3
Folder

1. Cabinet Secretariat, The Constitution of Japan, circa 1946
2. Copy of Correspondence between Douglas MacArthur and Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida, 1946-47
3. Diet Debates on Proposed Constitution, 1946-47
4. Oppler's Daily Activity Logs, 1946-47
5. Press Analyses of Reactions of Proposed Constitution, 1947
6. "Minutes of the Sixth Meeting of the Extraordinary Bill Revision Commission" [copy 1], 1947
7. "Minutes of the Sixth Meeting of the Extraordinary Bill Revision Commission" [copy 2], 1947
8. "Minutes of the Conference with Personnel, Government Section, G.H.Q., with regard to . . . Court Organization Law," 1947
9. Government Section, Report of Activities, 1947
10. Oppler, Memoranda Concerning Japanese Legislation, 1947-48
11. Supreme Court of Japan, Special Data, 1948
12. Supreme Court of Japan, Special Data (Appendix) [copy 1], 1948
13. Supreme Court of Japan, Special Data (Appendix) [copy 2], 1948
14. Legislative Summaries, Memoranda, and Requests for Legal Opinions, 1948-51
15. Oppler's Awards and Citations, 1948-52
      Contains material housed in flat file.
16. Oppler, "Far Eastern Section: The Reform of Japan's Legal and Judicial System Under Allied Occupation," Washington Law Review, 1949
17. Oppler, "Far Eastern Section: The Reform of Japan's Legal and Judicial System Under Allied Occupation," SCAP reprint, 1949
18. Ruling on Impeachment Case Involving Supreme Court Judges, 1949
19. Oppler, Speech Notes and Press Clippings, 1949-51
20. Newspaper Articles by and about Oppler, 1949-51
21. Diary Concerning Supreme Court Mission to the United States, 1950
22. Photograph of the Supreme Court Mission, 1950
23. Family Bureau, General Secretariat, Supreme Court of Japan, The Guide for the Family Court, circa 1950
24. GHQ, SCAP, Selected Data on the Occupation of Japan, circa 1950
25. Japanese Language Worksheets, circa 1950
26. Oppler, "Report of the Supreme Court Mission," 1951
27. Oppler's Engagement Calendar, 1951
28. Oppler, Daily Activity Reports, 1951
29. Oppler, Weekly Work Summaries, Legislation and Justice Division
30. "Final Briefings Presented to the Supreme Commander . . . Covering Portions of Occupation Duties," 1952
31. Photographs of Oppler with Japanese and American Officials, circa 1952?
32. Unidentified Photograph Taken in Japan, circa 1952?


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 4: Far Eastern Command, G-5/J-5 Section, circa 1952-1957

Box 3 (continued)
Folder

33. J-5 Briefing, circa 1952
34. Office of Public Information, Republic of Korea, Constitution, circa 1954
35. Oppler's Authorization to Visit Germany, 1955
36. Summary of Article on Foreign Influences on Japanese Law, 1955
37. Autographed Photograph of Colonel Louis M. Gosorn, 1955
38. Autographed Photograph of General Lyman L. Lemnitzer, circa 1955
39. Oppler's Awards and Citations, 1957
      Contains material housed in flat file.


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 5: United States Forces Japan, 1958-1959

Box 3 (continued)
Folder

40. Opinion Concerning Right of Assembly, 1958
41. Autographed Photograph of Major General Paul Caraway, 1958
42. Oppler's "Personal Interest Matter" File, 1958-59
43. Clippings, Press Summaries, and Memoranda Concerning the Sunakawa Case, 1959
      Contains material housed in flat file.
44. Oppler's Awards and Citations, 1959
      Contains material housed in flat file.
45. Inouye, "Historical Record of Federation of Japan Bar Association," 1959
46. "Statement of General Lemnitzer . . . on the United States Land Policy in the Ryukyu Islands," circa 1959?


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 6: Legal Reform in Occupied Japan, 1972-1977

Box 3 (continued)
Folder

47. Autobiographical Passage Not Published in Legal Reform, circa 1973
48. Passages Not Published in Legal Reform, circa 1973
49. Chapter Not Published in Legal Reform, circa 1973
50. Editorial Guidelines, Jacket Copy, and Addresses of Recipients of Review and Complementary Copies, circa 1973-76
51. Reviews of and Advertisements for Legal Reform, 1976-77


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 7: Encyclopedia of Japan, circa 1977-1982

Box 3 (continued)
Folder

52. List of Legal Entries, Style Manual, and Newsletters, 1978-80
53. Oppler's Entries on Sunakawa Case and U.S.-Japan Security Treaties, 1979
54. Entries by Ishimine, Sakai and Sakahara, and Steiner, 1979


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 8: Correspondence and Miscellaneous Writings, 1943-1982
Subseries 1: Correspondence, 1943-1981

Box 4
Folder

1. SCAP (Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers). General correspondence, 1949-1951.
2. Alden, Jane, 1951.
3. American Civil Liberties Union, 1950-1980 (including Abortion issues).
4. Ando, Nisuke, 1969.
5. Arima, Chusabaro (Japan Federation of Bar Associations), 1951.
6. Bevis, Howard L. (Ohio State University), 1951-1952.
7. Blakemore, Thomas L., 1976-1979.
8. Brown, Richard G., 1951.
* Buchholz, Walther (filed at end of Box 5).
9. Byrne, Brendan T., 1978.
10. Caraway, Paul W., 1961, 1974.
11. Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (Sanford Schwarz), 1943.
12. Carter, President Jimmy, 1980.
13. City of Norfolk, MacArthur Memorial, 1976-1977.
14. Coblenz, William A.1950-1951.
15. Dach, Joseph, 1951.
16. Dando, Shigemitsu, 1974, 1979.
17. Danelski, David J., 1967.
18. David, René, 1951-1952.
19. Denver Journal of International Law and Policy, 1979.
20. deWetter, Louise, 1967.
21. Douglas, Justice William O., 1974.
22. Ehrenzweig, Albert A., 1949, 1967.
23. Encyclopedia of Japan (Takeshi Kokubo), 1978-1981.
24. Epstein, Fritz T., 1950-1951.
25. Fisher, Adrian S., 1950-1951.
26. Foley, Edward H., 1950.
27. Fraenkel, Ernst, 1943.
28. Friedrich, Carl J., 1949-1950.
29. Hall, Livingston, 1951.
30. Hays, Frank E., 1950.
31. Henderson, Dan F., 1978.
32. Herring, Pendleton, 1950.
33. Horitsu Jihu, 1972-1973.
34. Hozumi, Shigeto, 1951.
35. Inoue, Masahito, 1979-1981.
36. International Biographical Archives and Dictionary of Central European Emigrés, 1933-45 (Harold A. Strauss), 1976-1979.
37. Jansen, Marius B., 1973.
38. Johnson, U. Alexis, 1952.
39. Kades, Charles L. (Hawkins, Delafield & Wood), 1950-1977.
40. Kobayashi, Justice Shunzo, 1951.
41. Koshi, George, 1977.
42. Lambie, Morris B., 1950.
43. Lemnitzer, General L. L., 1960.
44. Lochner, Louis P., 1967.
45. MacCoy, W. Pierce, 1951.
46. Mano, Judge Tsuyoski, 1951.
47. Martin, Charles E., 1950-1952.
48. Masui, Makoto, 1976.
49. Matsuo, Koya, 1974-1975.
50. Mendel, Douglas H., Jr., 1954.
51. Meyers, Howard, 1951-1952.
52. Moore, Paul D., 1973-1975.
53. Mori, Arthur K., 1951-1973.

Box 5
Folder

1. Nemoto, Matsuo, 1970.
2. Neptune, Robert H., 1952.
3. New York Times (Letters to the Editor), 1970-1980.
4. Ochs, Reiko, 1975.
5. Okuyama, Hachiro, 1951.
6. Onuma, Yasuaki, 1976-1977.
7. Parker, James Perkins, 1951.
8. Peattie, Mark, 1975.
9. Physicians, 1969-1980.
10. Prescott, Stanley, 1947.
11. Princeton University Library, 1980.
12. Princeton University Press, 1974-1980.
13. Quigley, Harold S., 1949-1950.
14. Redford, Larry (Juris Publici), 1977-1980.
15. Reischauer, Edwin O., 1974-1977.
16. Rheinstein, Max, 1950-1951.
17. Rodino, Peter W. J., 1978.
18. Ruete, Hans Hellmuth, 1978.
19. Schenck, Hubert G., 1952.
20. Shimbum, Asahi, 1971; transcripts of interview with Oppler.
21. Snow, Conrad E., 1950-1951.
22. Sodei, Rinjiro, 1976.
23. Steiner, Kurt, 1950-1979.
24. Takemae, Eiji, 1981.
25. Tanaka, Haruhiko, 1951.
26. Tanaka, Hideo, 1977-1979.
27. Tanaka, Kotaro, 1952, 1972.
28. Tanaka, M., 1950.
29. Tate, Jack B., 1951.
30. TV Man Union, Inc. (Tokyo), 1981.
31. Unno, Shinkichi, 1953.
32. Ward, Robert E., 1973.
33. Washington Law Review (Milton D. Green), 1949-1978.
34. Williams, Harrison A., 1965, 1978.
35. Williams, Justin, Sr., 1970-1976.
36. Yamanaka, Toshio, 1974-1975.
37 Yanagawa, Mafumi, 1951.
38. Yasumura, Kazuo, 1973.
39. Miscellaneous and unidentified, 1943-1978.
40-42. Buchholz, Walther, 1941-1959; 1960-1969; 1970-1979.
Buchholz, Walther.


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 8: Correspondence and Miscellaneous Writings, 1943-1982
Subseries 2: Articles and Speeches, 1961-1982

Box 6
Folder

1. "The Sunakawa Case: Its Legal and Political Implications" (pub.), 1961
2. Opinion on Israeli Law of Return (unpub.), circa 1970?
3. Notes for "Sidelights on MacArthur's Occupation of Japan" Speech (unpub.), circa 1972?
4. Oppler's Answers to Questions Posed by an Unknown Interviewer, circa 1975?
5. "The Dutchess of Stone Pond" (unpub.), circa 1978
6. Articles for Juris Publici (University of Richmond Law School), 1979-80
7. Notes for "Great Decisions: Japan" Speech (unpub.) and Clippings, 1982


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 8: Correspondence and Miscellaneous Writings, 1943-1982
Subseries 3: Notes, 1948-1973

Box 6 (continued)
Folder

8. Notes and Clippings on MacArthur, Civil Liberties, Japan, Germany, and Vietnam, 1948-1973
9. Notes on Prittie, Germans Against Hitler, circa 1965
10. Reading Notes on German, Japanese, and Korean Politics and Law, circa 1966
11. Notes on Dissertations and Books Concerning Japan, circa 1970?
12. Notes on Japan Civil Liberties Union, Japanese Judiciary and Japanese Law


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 9: Research Materials, 1944-1982
Subseries 1: Presentation Copies, 1961-1980

Box 6 (continued)
Folder

13. Nadelmann, "Das Minderheitsvotum in Kollegialgericht--Bekanntgabe oder Geheimhaltung ?" (pub.), 1961
14. Steiner, "Popular Political Participation and Political Development in Japan: The Local Level" (unpub.), circa 1965
15. Mache, "Die Überwindung des Amadisromans durch Andreas Heinrich Bucholtz" (pub.), 1966
16. Jansen, "Japan Looks Back" (pub.), 1968
17. Ando, "A Critical Appraisal of the Tokyo District Court's Decision on the Suikosha Case" (pub.), circa 1968
18. Derbolav, Essay in Pädagogik im Selbstdarstellung (pub.), 1976
19. Williams, "What the Japanese Are Like" (unpub.), 1980


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 9: Research Materials, 1944-1982
Subseries 2: Conference Documents, 1961-1980

Box 6 (continued)
Folder

20. Harvard University Japanese-American Program for Cooperation in Legal Studies, Papers [1 of 3], 1961
21. Harvard University Japanese-American Program for Cooperation in Legal Studies, Papers [2 of 3], 1961
22. Harvard University Japanese-American Program for Cooperation in Legal Studies, Papers [3 of 3], 1961
23. Princeton University Conference on the New Japan: Prospects and Promise, Participant List and Papers, 1962
24. Twenty-Eighth American Assembly on the United States and Japan, Final Report, 1965
25. Eleventh Southern Assembly on the United States and Japan, Papers, 1966
26. Amherst College International Conference on the Occupation of Japan, Orientation Materials, Participant List, and Two Papers, 1980


Alfred C. Oppler Papers
Box and Folder List

return to table of contents

Series 9: Research Materials, 1944-1982
Subseries 3: Articles and Reference Works, 1944-1982

Box 6 (continued)
Folder

27. Clippings Concerning France, Germany, Japan, and Poland, 1944-45
28. Japan Times Clippings, 1960
29. Texts of Japan-U.S. Treaty and Security Agreements, 1960
  Contains material housed in flat file.
30. Japan Commission on the Constitution, Papers [fragment], 1961
31. Kublin, What Shall I Read on Japan (pub.), 1961
32. Kublin, Useful Japanese (pub.), 1961
33. Overton, Travel in Japan (pub.), 1961Series 9:  Research Materials, 1944-82
34. Japanese-American Program for Cooperation in Legal Studies, "An Index to Japansese Law" (unpub.), 1961
35. Law Firm of Stitt and Hemmendinger, "Okinawa" (unpub.), 1962
36. Danielski, "The Supreme Court of Japan: An Exploratory Study" (unpub.), 1966
37. Stein, "Common-Law Marriage: Its History and Certain Contemporary Problems" (pub.), 1969
38. Jansen, "Japan and the United States" (unpub.), circa 1969
39. Unidentified Article on Japanese Law (pub.) and Clipping on Japan's Environmental Problems, 1970
40. Abegglin, Kahn, and Morley, Japan and the United States in the 1970s (pub.), 1970
41. Steiner, Book Review (pub.) and Two Short Articles (unpub.), 1974-circa 1975
42. Association for Asian Studies, Doctoral Dissertations on Asia (pub.), 1975
43. Committee on Asian Law, Association for Asian Studies, A Directory of Persons Interested in Asian Law (pub.), 1975
44. State of New York, Court on the Judiciary, In re Waltemeade (unpub.), 1975
45. Anderson, trans., The Law Partially Amending the Foreign Exchange and Foreign Trade Control Law (pub.), 1979
46. Hollerman, "International Economic Controls in Occupied Japan" (pub.), 1979
47. Masami, "Postwar Japanese Law and Legal Studies" (pub.), 1979
48. Moore, "Reflections on the Occupation of Japan" (pub.), 1979
49. Kawashima, "The Japanese Linguistic Consciousness and the Law" (pub.) and Letter from Marius Jansen, 1979-80
50. Vogel, "The Miracle of Japan" (pub.) and Letter to the New York Times, 1979-81
51. Japanese Press Summaries and Clippings, 1979-82
52. Materials By and About Justin Williams (pub.), 1980


Oversized Materials

return to table of contents

Series 1:  Biographical Materials, circa 1908-1982

53. Memorial Service Program and Obituaries, 1982

54. Series 2:  Harvard University, circa 1940-44

Subseries 2:  Notes, circa 1940-44

  55. Unsorted Notes on German History and Government (Notebook II), circa 1942


Flat Files

return to table of contents

Series 1:  Biographical Material, circa 1908-82

  Professional Activities of Ellen Oppler, 1977

Series 3:  Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, 1946-52

  Oppler's Awards and Citations, 1948-52

Series 4:  Far Eastern Command, G-5/J-5 Section, 1952-57

  Oppler's Awards and Citations, 1957

Series 5:  United States Forces Japan, 1958-59

  Clippings, Press Summaries, and Memoranda Concerning the Sunakawa Case, 1959
  Oppler's Awards and Citations, 1959

Series 9: Research Materials, 1944-82
Subseries 3:  Articles and Reference Works, 1944-82

   Texts of Japan-U.S. Treaty and Security Agreements, 1960


Reference E-mail | Find Collections | Find Other Historical Resources
About the Department | Department Services and Policies
View Exhibits | View Blog
Department Home Page

Last updated December 12, 2006