M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives

UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

Finding Aid for the
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
RECORDS, 1921-1989

(UA-804)

This finding aid does not have a complete box and folder list.

For reference queries contact Grenander Department Reference staff or (518)-437-3935.

Finding Aid Compiled by
Heloise Dubreuil
May 7, 1992

Revised by Sara Rohfeld
September 27, 1994







M. E. Grenander Department of Special Collections & Archives 
University Libraries / University at Albany / State University of New York 
1400 Washington Avenue / Albany, New York 12222 / (518) 437-3935


VOLUME: 5.3 cubic ft.

ACQUISITION: All items in this record group were transferred to the University Libraries, M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, by the Student Association.

ACCESS: Access to this record group is unrestricted.

COPYRIGHT: The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of copyright. Whenever possible, the M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives will provide information about copyright owners and other restrictions, but the legal determination ultimately rests with the researcher. Requests for permission to publish material from this collection should be discussed with the Head of Special Collections and Archives.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Administrative History

Student Association Presidents

Scope and Content Note

Series Descriptions

Box and Folder List


Student Association
Administrative History

Back to table of contents

The current Student Association was formed in 1921.  Interest in forming a student government dates from 1914.  At that time, President Milne rejected a student petition to form a student government commenting, "There is no place in this institution for the association and activities contemplated in this petition".**1  President A.R. Brubacher(1915-1939) took a more favorable attitude toward student government.  In response to a 1915 student petition, he instructed Professor Risley to form a committee to study the possibility of creating a student government**2.  There appears to have been an attempt at forming a rudimentary student organization in January, 1916**3.  As a result of Risley's study, Myskania was formed in 1917.  Myskania, referred to in their 1917 constitution as the student council, was an honorary body consisting entirely of seniors who were to represent "the opinion and to improve the department of the student body."**4  Myskania, in turn, created the Student Association in 1921.  The general business of running student funded activities such as the yearbook and the student newspaper appears to have been the concern of the Student Assembly.**5  The new Student Association appears to have carried on the responsibilities of the Student Assembly.  (For a history of Myskania, see the Myskania finding aid.)

The Student Association s' original purpose as stated in its 1921 constitution, was "the management of all matters of student interest not academic in nature."**6  The Student Association controlled the legislative, financial and executive powers of the government, while Myskania acted as a single judicial branch and as guardian of school traditions.  According to the 1921 constitution, the executive duties of the S.A. fell on the executive board made up of the president, the vice president, the secretary and the treasurer.  The Executive Board's duty was to carry out the provisions of the Assembly and act as a court of appeals.**7  By 1928, a new constitution for the Student Association changed the executive branch.  Instead of the Executive Board, the executive branch was run by Student Council, different from the original student council (Myskania), which was made up of the president, the vice president, the secretary, and the presidents of the four classes.  The new Student Council had broader duties than the Executive Board including: arranging the program for Student Association meetings, providing for the publication of the student directory, charter all boards, committees and associations by securing support from the Student Association through the budget and executing all legislation passed by the Student Association .**8

A new constitution ratified in 1965 made yet another change in the Student Association.  The Central Council was created and consisted of Student Association members, student commission members, faculty members and members of the pan-hellenic council.  The duties of the new Central Council included: enforcing laws of the Student Association , a responsibility for student conduct in and around the university, student relations with the university community and the broader community, control of student finances, determining the student tax, and a responsibility for Student Association election and tabulating the results of the elections.  Myskania was replaced as the judicial branch by the Supreme Court, but continued as guardian of school traditions and recommended candidates for the Supreme Court.**9  Myskania gradually lost its governmental power and was dissolved in 1979.

Currently the Student Association consists of a three branch system of government: executive, legislative and judicial.  The Executive Branch is headed by the President who acts as a spokesperson for the organization to inform the public of Student Government activities.  The Vice President is in charge of the inner workings of the organization.  Within the Executive Branch, there are office directors who oversee committees of different concerns such as: Affirmative Action, Controller (of finance), Educational Affairs, Media, Multi-cultural Affairs, Student Voice, Programing and Wymyn's Issues.  These committees reflect the contemporary concerns of the students.  The Central Council acts as the Legislative Branch of the Student Association .  The Council is unicameral, with six committees that deal with all aspects of student life.  Representatives are taken from each Quad and off campus to insure that all sectors of the University's population have a voice in student government.  Any student can be a member of a committee by simply attending meetings.  A Supreme Court rules on the legality of legislation and student council actions.  It is composed of seven members including a Chief Justice, nominated by the President and confirmed by two thirds approval of the Central Council.**11

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notes
1. French and French College of the Empire State, p.185
2. Student Petition, circa 1915; letter Brubacher to Risley, Feb 15, 1915, class of 1915 memorabilia, Alumni    Memorabilia Collection
3. The Echo Jan, 1916, p.246
4. State College For Teachers Pedagogue, 1917
5. State College News, June 4, 1920, p.2
6. State College News, October 17, 1921, p. 2.
7. Ibid.
8. State College Hand Book 1930-1931
9. Campus Viewpoint 1966, pp 35-39
10. Viewpoints 1991-92, p. 14.


Student Association Presidents

Back to table of contents

1921-1922 Eunice Rice 
1922-1923 May Bure Wood 
1923-1924 Evelyn Dutcher 
1924-1925 Edmund Crane 
1925-1926 Muriel L. Wenzel 
1926-1927 Bertha Zajan 
1927-1928 Ruth Lane 
1928-1929 Evelyn Graves 
1929-1930 Marion E. Bocco 
1930-1931 Russell W. Ludlum 
1931-1932 Isabel J. Peard 
1932-1933 Katherine Moore 
1933-1934 Grenfeld Rand 
1934-1935 Clifford Rand 
1935-1936 Paul Bulgar 
1936-1937 John Deno 
1937-1938 Warren Denshore 
1938-1939 John Edge 
1939-1940 Lloyd Kelly 
1940-1941 Merrill Walrath 
1941-1942 Ralph Tibbets 
1942-1943 Donald Vann 
1943-1944 Patricia Latimer 
1944-1945 Florence Garfall 
1945-1946 Helen Slack Shore 
1946-1947 Ruth Bently 
1947-1948 Alice Prindle
1948-1949 John Jennings
1949-1950 Anthony Prochilo
1950-1951 James Jrusto
1951-1952 William T. Wiley
1952-1953 John Lannon
1953-1954 Neil Brown
1954-1955 Charles Beckwith
1955-1956 Robert Betscha
1956-1957 Clyde Payne
1957-1958 Richard Hinck
1958-1959 John Yager
1959-1960 Robert Helwig
1960-1961 Richard Robinson
1961-1962 Dave Booker
1962-1963 Stephen Condojane
1963-1964 Patrick Corra
1964-1965 Arthur Johnson
1965-1966 Richard Thompson
1966-1967 William T. Cleaveland
1967-1968 Jeffrey Mishkin
1968-1969 Duncan Nixon
1969-1970 Terry Mathias
1970-1971 Dave Neufeld
1971-1973 Mike Lampert
1973-1974 Steve Gerber
1974-1975   Patrick Curran
1975-1976 Andy Bauman
1976-1977 Steve DiMeo
1977-1978 David Gold
1978-1979 Paul Fieldman
1979-1980 Lisa Newmark
1980-1981 Susan Gold
1981-1982 Dave Pologe
1982-1983 Michael Corgo
1983-1985 Rich Schaffer
1985-1986 Steve Gawley
1986-1987 "Paco" Duarte
1987-1988 Matteo Doddo
1988-1989 James Lamb
1989-1990 Andy DiPalma
1990-         Fermin Espinoza
1990-1991 Steven D. Richards
1991-1992 William Weitz
1992-1993 Diego Munoz
1993-1994 Christopher Hahn
1994         Cliff Lent
1995         Alexandra Blaine
1995-1996 Larry Kauffman
1996-1997 Michael Castrilli
1997-1998 Rasheem Ameid-Rook
1998-1999 Ashwani Prabhakar
1999-2000 Christopher Snell
2000-2001 Erin McCampbell
2001-2002 David Bishop
2002-2003 Kirk Douglas
2003-2004 Lawrence Migliore
2004-2005 Mahaliel Bethea
2005-2006 Mahaliel Bethea
2006-2007 Nick Chuichillo

Student Association
Scope and Content Note

Back to table of contents

The Student Association records, consisting of meeting minutes, subject files, student publications, booklets, bills and committee files.  In the 1920's and 30's the Student Association was concerned with establishing and maintaining school traditions, and such academic issues as the establishment of the honor system.  In the 1930's and 40's the Student Association held assemblies on contemporary issues such as the presidential campaigns, the New Deal and World War II.  In 1949 the Student Association was involved in a project called CARE, an organization to help the children of the war.  By the end of the 1960's, emphasis was put on student rights and equal opportunity.  Minorities began to organize them selves and form groups including the Women's Liberation Front, Black Students Alliance and Lesbians for Freedom and the Student Association gave formal recognition to these new organizations.  At the same time the Student Association supported new programs such as the Equal Opportunity Program (EOP), developed in 1973.  While continuing to sponsor equal opportunity programs for all races and creeds, the Student Association has also, in more recent years, turned its attention to the environment (NYPIRG was recognized on campus in 1982), as well as supported such academic initiatives as the Frosh Reading Program.  Long term issues include opposition to ROTC, during the 1960's and 70's for its support for the United States Government's Vietnam War policy, in the 1980's because ROTC discriminated against gay and lesbian candidates; reproductive rights and the establishment of a Birth Control Center on campus.  The prominent development of the 1970's through 1990's was the Student Association s new power in academic affairs--one prominent example of that was their accessing the competence of teaching faculty.  The results of their surveys were distributed in the ACT and SCATE Booklets.


Student Association
Series Descriptions

Back to table of contents

Series 1: Student Association and Central Council Minutes, 1921-29, 1932-41, 1943-49, 1966-68, 1970-74, 1975-77, 1978-86, 1987-1989, 2.0 cubic ft.  Arranged chronologically.

The earliest minutes date from the formation of the Student Association in 1921.  They document the Student Association 's interest in establishing and maintaining school traditions (1920's and 30's), the Student Association 's concern with academic issues such as the establishment of the honor system.  In the 1930's and 40's Student Association assemblies dealt with contemporary issues such as the presidential campaigns, the New Deal, and World War II.  In 1949 the Student Association was involved in a project called CARE, an organization to help the children of the war.  From the end of the 1960's the Student Association has placed increasing emphasis on student rights and equal opportunity.  Minorities began to organize themselves and form groups including the Women's Liberation Front, Black Students Alliance and Lesbians for Freedom and the Student Association gave formal recognition to these new organizations.  The trend continues to this day.  At the same time the Student Association supported new programs such as the Equal Opportunity Program (EOP), developed in 1973.  While continuing to sponsor equal opportunity programs for all races and creeds, the Student Association has also, in more recent years, turned its attention to the environment (NYPIRG was recognized on campus in 1982.  These documents give an overview of the management of the organization, and document the Student Association structural change.

Series 2: Central Council Bills, 1965/66-1988/89, 1.7 cubic ft.  Arranged chronologically.

The Central Council Bills are complete for the period 1965/66-1988/89.  This series contains bills passed by the Central Council which is the legislative body of the student government.  The bill relate to appropriations, budgets, recognition of student organizations, resolutions relating to local, state, national and international issues, student government reorganizations.  The bills dating from 1978-79 to 1988-89 are bound and indexed from 1978/79 through 1985/86.

Series 3: Subject Files, 1940-44, 1958-88, 1 cubic ft.  Arranged alphabetically.

This series contains constitutions, budgets, ACT (teaching assessment) proposals, announcements and newsletters, Moving-up Day programs, and government reorganization papers.  In some cases there is extensive information on proposals such as the ACT's and the Ebenezer Howard Project, 1970-71, an attempt to involve students in the problems of urban poverty.  The subjects range from local to state wide concerns including other SUNY schools.

Series 4: Committee Files, 1949-75, .3 cubic ft.  Arranged alphabetically.

The Committee Files 1949-75 contain bills and minutes, constitutions, government reorganization files, and ballots relating to the proposals and projects made by different committees to the Central Council.  The committees include the Academic Affairs Commission, 1967-71, Athletic Advisory Board, 1970-71, Big 4 Committee, 1949-53, Constitutional Revisions Committee, 1965, 1969, Election Commission, 1973-75, and the Government Reorganization Committee, 1962-64.    Examples of some projects are: the Frosh Reading Program, Assembly Bill #4162 (1971-72) regarding the use of non-virgin paper on campus and the establishment of a Birth Control Center for students.

Series 5: Assessment of Courses and Teachers (ACT and SCATE booklets), 1974-76, 1987, 1991, .3 cubic ft.

The ACT and SCATE Booklets are an example of the growing influence of the Student Association on the Administration.  The Student Association gained the permission of the Administration to publish surveys of courses and teachers which are available to the students so that they could make more informed decisions in choosing their courses.  The collection is incomplete, and while the faculty evaluations from the 1970's appear to be comprehensive, those from the 1980's and 1990's only publish ratings of a few courses where the faculty has given permission to publish.


Student Association
Box and Folder List

Back to table of contents

Series 1: Student Association and Central Council Minutes

Box 1

Minutes (1 folder), 1921-1929
Minutes (3 folders), 1932-1941
Minutes (4 folders), 1943-1949
Minutes (2 bound volumes), 1966-1968
Minutes (6 folders), 1970-1973

Box 2

Minutes (8 folders), 1973-1977
Minutes (9 bound volumes), 1977-1986

Box 3

Minutes (3 bound volumes), 1987-1989 Student Association


Student Association
Box and Folder List

Back to table of contents

Series 2: Central Council Bills, 1965-1989

Box 1

Bills (17 folders), 1965/66-1977/78
Bills (bound volume), 1966/67
Bills (bound volume), 1978/79
Bills (folder), 1979/80
Bills (3 bound volumes), 1980-1983

Box 2

Bills (3 bound volumes), 1984/85-1986/87

Box 3

Bills (2 bound volumes), 1987/88-1988/89


Student Association
Box and Folder List

Back to table of contents

Series 3: Subject Files, 1940-1944, 1958-1988

Box 1

1. Academic Affairs Commission - Report to Central Council, 1971
2. Accountants' Report: Financial statements and Supplementary, 6/30/1967
3. Airforce ROTC "Cross Town" agreement, 1968
4. Announcements, 1970-80
5. Assessment of Courses and Teachers (ACT)- blank questionnaires, 1974-75, 1983
6. Athletic Advisory Board (budget, rules), 1967
7. Ballots, 1974-76
8. Bits and Pieces, 1970, 1974
9. Budgets, 1948-49
10. Budgets- requests, 1958-59
11. Budgets, 1959-60
12. Budgets, 1961-62
13. Budgets, 1965-69
14. Budgets- summary, 1969-70
15. Budgets, 1970-
16. Budget Committee Minutes, 3/19, 3/26 & 4/3 1979
17. Central Council (Parking Strike), undated
18. Central Council (Student Tax Policy, Nomination Form, Correspondence and Flyers), circa 1970-75
19. Central Council (Supreme Court application), circa 1965
20. Committee on Univ. Governance (SUNY Binghamton, Buffalo, Albany), 1967-69
21. Committee Reports and Recommendations, 1950-1952
22. Committee to Draft Campus Alcohol Policy - Recommendation, 1969
23. Composition Services (styles and sizes), undated
24. Consolidated Laws and Regulations of S.A., 1973
25. Consolidated Laws and Regulations of S.A., 5/11/1976
26. Constitution (Tentative) of the State College Student Association , 5/15/1945
27. Constitution, 1965
28. Constitution, 1987-88
29. Constitution, undated
30. Constitution S.A. "Board", circa 1962
31. Correspondence, 1951, 59, 70-71
32. Directories, 1970-77
33. Ebenezer Howard Project, 1970-71
34. Elections (flyers), 1972-78, 1984-87
35. Financial Policies, undated
36. Financial Resolutions, 1943-49
37. Financial Statements, 6/30/1974
38. Flyers and Brochures, circa 1970-86
39. Forms, circa 1965-77
40. Form Letters to Faculty Members, 1952, 70, 72, 76, 85, 86
41. Form Letters to Students and Their Parents, circa 1975-77
41. Government Reorganization Committee (Correspondence), 1962
42. Government Revision Workshop, Nov. 1964
43. Groups (Directory of student and other S.A. recognized groups), 1974-75
44. Informer (Issues #1, #2), 1978
45. Living Area Affairs Commission (Rationale for women's hours), 3/15/67
46. Memorandum, 1968-75
47. Moving-up Day Programs and Recommendations, circa 1940-60
48. NYSCT Leadership Conference, 5/23/1954
49. Off-Campus Student Co-op, 1975
50. Operating Expenses: Central Council, 1969-70
51. Press Release ("Restoration of Carver Community Health Center Funding."), 10/5/1973
52. Procedures for Organizational Recognition, 1972
53. Schedule for Letter Writing Campaign, undated
54. Student Affairs Council (Minutes), 2/5 & 3/6 1974
55. Student Association Handbook (SUNY Plattsburgh), 1979-80
56. Student Evaluation of Courses and Teachers (Blank questionnaires and Instructions), circa 1968-74
57. Student Government Conference (Information, Correspondence, Memoranda), 1964
58. Student Government (Reorganization Workshop), 11/21/1964
59. Student Senate (Government Reorganization Committee), 1962-63
60. Student Senate (Minutes), 1963-64
61. Student Senate (Reports), 1963-64
62. Transportation Committee (Rules and Regulations), undated
63. University Athletics Council (Final Report), 1968


Student Association
Box and Folder List

Back to table of contents

Series 4: Committee Files, 1949-1975

Box 1

1. Academic Affairs Commission, 1967-71
2. Athletic Advisory Board (S.A. Bills and Minutes), 1970-71
3. Big 4 Committee (Recommendations), 1949-53
4. Constitutional Revisions Committee, 1965, 1969
5. Election Commission (Ballots), 1973-75
6. Government Reorganization Committee, 1962-64



Reference E-mail | Find Collections | Find Other Historical Resources
About the Department | Department Services and Policies
View Exhibits | View Blog
Department Home Page

Last updated August 21, 2007